22. Jessica Mogill, Crisp — Systems and Processes: Level Up Your Firm’s Efficiency

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Crisp has grown from $500 to over $40 Million in just nine years. This success is thanks, in no small part, to Jessica Mogill. Jessica’s official title is Head of Coaching Strategy but she has done it all – from sales to systems. The former industrial engineer has laid the track for the exponential growth of Crisp. Today we dive into asking for – and taking – help. Why you needed to implement processes yesterday. What systems every female-run law firm needs and establishing boundaries around the non-negotiables in your life.

For 25% off of your ticket to the Crisp Summit in Atlanta, go to CrispSummit.com and enter the promo code RANKINGS.

What’s In This Episode

  • Who is Jessica Mogill?
  • How did the right hand of Crisp transition from industrial engineering to business consulting?
  • How can solo attorneys and firm owners ensure the systems in place actually get used?
  • What personality assessments help build stronger teams?
  • What can women learn from the female-led panels at the upcoming Crisp Summit?

Transcript

Jessica Mogill

We’ve got a vision and that vision is to help a thousand law firm owners grow by over a million dollars each to create a billion-dollar billion-dollar impact in the industry.

Sonya Palmer

No matter your goal, processes, and systems will help you get there faster. Take it from an expert.

Jessica Mogill

And my role changes and evolves with that to make sure that we’re on track to hit that target.

Sonya Palmer

According to a recent survey, only 19% of managing partners in US law firms are female. We’d like to see that change. Hello, and welcome to LawHER, the show where we celebrate the trailblazing attorneys and entrepreneurs who are changing the game for women in the legal field. Be inspired by their stories. Learn from their mistakes. And look forward to the future they’re helping build for the next generation of women in law. I’m Sonya Palmer, your host and VP of Operations at Rankings. The SEO agency of choice for Personal Injury lawyers. This is LawHER Jessica Mogill’s official title is Head of Coaching Strategy at Crisp. But she has done it all – from sales to systems. If Crisp Video is the train, Jessica has laid the tracks while gaining speed. Her background in industrial engineering and business consulting has helped the agency grow from $500 to over $40 Million in just nine years. Today we dive into asking for – and taking – help. Why did you need to implement systems yesterday? And establishing boundaries around the non-negotiables in your life. Jessica – before her role at Crisp – began her career as an engineer. It’s no secret that women are wildly underrepresented in STEM. She takes us back to her time at Auburn as one of a handful of female students. Let’s dive in.

Jessica Mogill

So I grew up loving numbers and math, and I essentially knew I did not want to be a teacher and I did not want to be an accountant. And so I left with not that many options. My mom will even go back to say, when. Little at the grocery store. Like I would try to count the change faster than the cashier would give it back. And so my head has just always been going and going. And I landed a full-ride scholarship to Auburn and I grew up, if anyone is an SCC football fan, a massive Alabama fan, my dad went there. I was going to go there. And then I got a full ride to Auburn at their engineering school. And you can’t say no to that. Nope. That’ll do it.

Sonya Palmer

yep. congratulations. Yes.

Jessica Mogill

Thank you. Thank you.

Sonya Palmer

So at Auburn, did you have expectations of what around, like what your educational experience would be like, and then how was it different from what you expected?

Jessica Mogill

And thinking back, at 18, what do you know? It was like, okay, I’m gonna pick up, I’m gonna move away. And I knew that there were not many women engineers, so I did. Anticipate that, of course, but I think hindsight is always 2020, and certain classes are like, did I need that? Was that necessary? And so I think also just there’s so much self-awareness that I have now that I didn’t have then, and something I hope to instill in our daughters as well. There are so many life things to learn. But if I had to do it all over again, I, in this day and age, knowing what I know, I don’t know that I would do the same thing.

Sonya Palmer

That’s an excellent point. I do think that college, like formal education, is undervalued for its life experiences and they tend.

Jessica Mogill

yes.

Sonya Palmer

Overvalue it for education, like learning skills and you can substitute the life experiences elsewhere, still need to intentionally do that. Absolutely. Yes. So then where did your degree lead you?

Jessica Mogill

So when I first graduated, I worked actually for cap Gemini. So it’s a big consulting firm, Accenture did that for a couple of years, realized like, Hey, you’re a cog in the wheel. There are 70,000 employees globally. And I just. I wasn’t fulfilled there. I knew I wasn’t. And so that then led me to go like full engineering and I’m an industrial engineer. So my brain never turns off. I am constantly thinking about how things can be done better and faster and more efficiently, whether it’s at Crisp or whether I’m somewhere in an unknown experience. And I went to work for a company actually in Indiana, and it was like materials handling and warehouses. So believe it or not, I had to invest in a hard hat. I had to invest in some steel-toe boots. And that was my life I was in and out of factories. Girl scout, a cookie factory, got to see where all the magic happens, where they make those went to the Honda factories where, they are all of the cars on the line, everything. And I don’t regret any of that. Learned a lot. And that is the place. I will say. A thousand percent of women were very underrepresented when it came to that field, for sure. I was like a sore thumb walking into these warehouses. I believe it. You got to like the full engineer experience with the hard hat and the steel toe boots. the steel toe boots, if anyone ever finds cute steel toe boots, I would love to know I searched and searched.

Sonya Palmer

I’ll keep an eye out. ultimately you decided that you didn’t want to stay on that path. How did you transition then to business consult?

Jessica Mogill

So candidly, what happened? And it’s the day of social media. And I guess if you even wanna go back to college and how things just come full circle. I had a few friends on social media and I saw they were traveling all the time and they look like, of course, that glamorous lifestyle that everyone thinks when you’re traveling all the time and it is not but. I was just really just interested. I was in my mid-twenties and I was like, I have no reason to not do this right now. And fortunately, I knew this girl well enough. And she was, she was a leader at this company, hired me on the spot. I did not even interview for it. And went in and decided, all right, this is what I’m going to do. And I trained over 300 offices across us. Once I entered that profession,

Sonya Palmer

Wow. Did you pull any lessons that you had learned, like during engineering into business consulting?

Jessica Mogill

So it doesn’t always seem like it will translate. industrial engineering for those of you who don’t know is the most business-sided one. Like I. Statistics classes upon statistics classes. And literally, I remember one of the test problems being like, okay, you’ve got an iPod and you have 5,000 songs and you put it on shuffle. What are the probabilities that you hear the same song twice in an hour? That’s just constantly in my head and that’s how it, my brain just operates. And Being in those classes from 18 years old until now those things are constantly in my head. So even when I would go into a warehouse, I was there to look at it and say, how can I make this more efficient? Do I need to install a conveyor belt here? Do we need to build a robot here? What is it that I need to do to make this better and faster? And what is the business at the end of the day, you’ve gotta make it better. You’ve gotta make it faster. You’ve got that is what you do at the core of any business. Yes.

Sonya Palmer

You mentioned numbers loving numbers and of course, numbers are very important to businesses. So I do think it’s a very natural transition.

Jessica Mogill

yes, exactly. Put me with a spreadsheet and I am as happy as I could be.

Sonya Palmer

I love it. And then over eight years ago when you joined Crisp, it was for a 30-day stint. can you tell us that story?

Jessica Mogill

Yes. So I was living my life as a consultant. I was in 12 cities a month. I think my record, I flew 175,000 miles in one year, and it was time to hang up that hat, and Michael and I, for the record, we were already in a relationship. I always make that so clear I was coming up on a transitional phase and I was like, I don’t know what I wanna do next. And. He’s oh, I’ve got this company. Why don’t you come in for 30 days? I’ll pay you. I just want you to, do an assessment, see what’s happening, what’s going on. And next month, we’ll mark eight years of this 30-day stent that we’ve been on.

Sonya Palmer

That’s amazing. So then what is your role with Crisp? Can you explain that?

Jessica Mogill

So I think I do a little bit of everything. And I will say, especially in the beginning, when I came in with Michael, there were seven people on the team and none of those seven are here anymore. I will say that. And I came in and reached havoc if you’re not a process person and you were, people were used to showing up when they wanted to, and maybe they showed up, maybe they didn’t. And I was like, this is not how this is gonna function. And through all of that, honestly, like for a long time, I guess my title was director of operations. And then we just grew and scaled and got to a point that it’s not that I didn’t want to do that anymore. But then we also had kids. And so it was like, I have done so much and I have done every night and every weekend for probably I guess, five years straight at that point. And. I was like, all right, it’s time, to take a step back. And we brought in a COO, we’ve got an amazing leadership team. And so now if we have to land on a title, I am not a title person. It is the head of the coaching strategy. So what I essentially do is make sure that the messaging is congruent with all of the coaching programs that we offer from, our top level and across to their team members and making sure that everything is just consistent across the board.

Sonya Palmer

Often with companies that scale very quickly, the people that you start with. Are not the people that you end with. There’s an evolution that takes place. So that makes sense. And I’m an operations person and I do also think that when the operations are good, like the person overseeing that their role can evolve. Like you can step out and go do something else cuz you got it in working order. So I think that’s excellent.

Jessica Mogill

That’s the goal. I think of any great operators. You get it to a point where it’s like, all right, this can run. We can do this. And it doesn’t require me every second of every day. Now I’m sure we’ll talk about this because you don’t just step away entirely, but there are always checks and balances in place. Always.

Sonya Palmer

Yeah. Yes, completely. Crisp has doubled in revenue every year and hits its targets. So how has that role evolved?

Jessica Mogill

Yes. Yes. So I will first say that I think the biggest pain you could ever inflict on someone is like a massive operational challenge overnight. So when we had our first summit in 2018, We had no idea what to expect. And I will say in a matter of two days, our company essentially tripled. So we went from being a 5 million company in 2017 to now over 16 million company in two days. And I was eight months pregnant. So it was the perfect storm. But you could ever really ask for, and my role has drastically changed. Even since then, like in the beginning, I was doing everything from booking travel and I was running payroll. At that point, we only had video offerings. I was going to shoot and fly across the country to project manage them. I was building the booths at all of these legal events and trade shows and conferences that we went to and I was doing sales. Honestly, that’s how the first process ever came to be on a little tangent, but Michael did not have a sales process and he was doing literally everything inbound. And so anything that came in, he would get on the phone, close the deal. I’m telling you at this point, we were working with the dentist. We filmed a beef jerky conference once. I will tell you when I came, we say we came from nothing. Like you took every deal you could get. And I was like, Michael, there’s gotta be a process. What is it that you’re saying that’s working, blah, blah, blah? So of course I document this process. shadow him and I was like, great, I have this process. So now I’m gonna hand this process over to the next person we hire and we’re gonna test the process. Michael in his very expeditious ways said we’re gonna change the inbound number and it’s gonna ring to you now and you’re gonna test the process. And that’s how I knew the process worked. I became a salesperson I just think with the Evolution of everything is like now my role is really to help shape the future of coaching. So we have been able to, like I said, hire amazing leaders. When I first had Mila our oldest one in 2018, I ran payroll from the hospital. Like I have a photo of me in the hospital bed, rounding payroll. And that was my moment of Two people in this company know how to run payroll, Michael, and me, and we’re both in the hospital right now. So it’s just ever evolving. Unfortunately, I’m out of so many of those details, but we’ve got a vision and that vision is to help a thousand law firm owners grow by over a million dollars each to create a billion-dollar impact in the industry. And my role changes and evolves with that to make sure that we’re on track to hit that target.

Sonya Palmer

You just laid out a very perfect natural progression. I’m very excited to talk to you about processes. And then, just the verbiage that you use, is music to my ears because I think people overcomplicate them and it’s like what you said, it’s documented so I’m gonna do it. I’m gonna write down what I did. And then I’m gonna try again and I’m gonna use it. I’m gonna see what. So for you to do that with sales, which wasn’t necessarily your like natural forte, but then you just did it with coaching too. So it’s

Jessica Mogill

oh yeah.

Sonya Palmer

okay. I figured out how to do this. Now I’m gonna go teach other people how to do this. So it makes it’s a com it’s a perfect transition.

Jessica Mogill

Yes. Yes. And I will say with that, with, and I tell firms this all the time I don’t care if it’s you and you’re a solo person and you have no one else. I don’t care if your team is like 200 people. The time to start processes was yesterday. If you don’t have them, like now, and now, especially the smaller firms. I encourage them cuz I’m like if I knew then what I know now I would’ve structured things so differently.

Sonya Palmer

Yes. And remotely, I think a lot of people struggled with that going from being in person in-person to remote. And they’re like we know how to do this. if we’re not looking at each other. it’s one thing to listen to podcasts, and read books on business development. But sometimes it’s just that st, they don’t implement it. What do you think the firm’s own even the solo attorneys can do to ensure that those processes are implemented in the first place?

Jessica Mogill

say start now, like big, small anything, and as morbid as it sounrally tells people what if you got hit by a bus tomorrow, but.

Sonya Palmer

Yeah, we follow that principle too.

Jessica Mogill

Truly what happens if you get hit by a bus like this is, it’s a real thing. And my thing with processes is of course documenting. And reiterate to people like they are living, breathing documents, processes are never done that like what we did in 2017, doesn’t work now and that’s fine. You just have to stay on top of it. I highly recommend a platform of some sort to house everything and just makes sure that. It’s all there together. And then honestly, in terms of making them, thek and making sure that they’re implemented, I live by trustee t that verify. So we, at the size that we’re at now, have a full-time auditor. This person’s job is literally to audit anything from sales calls to inboxes, to like literally, yes. . I know you’re like music to my ears is oh, yes. It is like a dream role for me. I’m not gonna lie, but probably not the highest and best use of my time. But really going off of that and just trust, but verify. And I never assume ill intent anything. And then I also always say it always comes back to the leader and Michael, we actually had our three-month meeting this morning. And if you do not tell someone what great looks like they will determine their own. Great. And so he used this example and said, all right, I want you guys to book a hotel, a nice hotel. One person might book the Ritz. One person might book the Waldorf. One person might book the Lowe’s. Everyone’s definition of great is different. And so really looking at that and saying okay, define that for them. And when it comes to organizing and actual processes and things like that I even do still spot check everything while it’s not my job to be the full-time auditor. That’s what you gotta do. And I think any business owner, like you, has to be willing to get into those details sometimes.

Sonya Palmer

Yes. Bene Brown and her newest book, Atlas of the Heareferers to that as paint it did. So her team will go to her and say okay, paint this done. What does it look for you like when it’s complete? So I think that the leader, you have to tell them what it looks like when it’s finished.

Jessica Mogill

Cause they’ll define it themselves and sometimes it’s right. Sometimes it’s not right, but you can’t get mad at the end of the day. If you didn’t tell them, you can’t get, you can’t get upset about it.

Sonya Palmer

Yes. Exactly. So many of the women that we talk to on this podcast have started their firms, largely because the like seven, seven Workday is not working for them, for women looking to start their firms or kind of strike out on their own. Is there anything that you see there that could make an impact on them?

Jessica Mogill

Absolutely. I could probably talk about this forever because it’s been a hard thing for me. I. Not like e complete control freak, but I came in to do operations. So to some l, even I’m a control freak, and over time, not having just one kid, but two kids now, like you do have to step back. And so I think for any woman, especially if they’re a mother You gotta be easy on yourself sometimes. And it’s so much easier said than done, but I don’t know if you’ve ever seen Shonda RHS. She did the commencement speech at Dartmouth. And have you seen this? Yes. And I even literally know like the timestamp of when she did this, as like nothing has ever rang truer to me cuz she was basically, they like, how do you do it all? And her answer simply was I, Don. And the reality is I’m like not even an emotional person and it like hit me so hard because she’s the reality is while I’m here, something is suffering with my children while I’m at home at bath time, something at my business is suffering. And so that’s just the truth. Like you, you cannot do it all. And it truly does take a village. Like I’m so fortunate. I’ve got both sets of parents that can help with that as well. But I think any woman going into that. You just have to define your non-negotiables. So when our first daughter was born non-negotiable I was gonna be home every night for bath time. And that still rings true. Right now. I leave at six o’clock every day. I will get back on if I need to work until midnight, but my non-negotiable is that I will be there with my children every night in bed. And so I think it’s really important that someone defines that because then you can’t get frustrated later and you’re like, all right, everyone knows, nothing on my calendar is gonna get booked beyond that. Of course, there are exceptions, the summit, things like that. But at least define that upfront. And I will say to anyone, who’s telling you, they’re doing it perfectly. They’re lying. Like they are. And there are moments of course, where you’re like, I really should be at this, or I should be at that and take the help. It’s one thing to even ask for help, but also take the help. Yes.

Sonya Palmer

So true. I. I have loved listening to these very powerful very business mind, women who are mothers talk about their non-negotiables. So the bath time, and sometimes it’s just, I’m packing my kids lunch. That’s I want to do that no matter what I’m picking them up from school. I will not miss a game. So I think that non-negotiable, whatever it is it could be the most simple thing or the most complex thing. Define it for.

Jessica Mogill

Exactly.

Sonya Palmer

Can communicate it. So I love that. And I do think for women in general, trying to break out of that traditional law firm or business systems and processes are your friend. If you can improve efficiency.

Jessica Mogill

This is up and I can delegate.

Sonya Palmer

We cannot do all the things all the time. Hire the right people for the job. Jessica shares how Crisp hones in on the people who will make the most positive impact.

Jessica Mogill

Yes. Yes. So a few things here, if anyone’s ever heard anything about the way that we hire or do anything, we use a lot of assessments. So we use the print assessment, which is really why you do what you do. And we use the Colby assessment, which is how you do what you do. We do look for certain scores within those. But to summarize that without using those scores, I look for someone who is very objective. Like they cannot look at things emotionally and or subjectively. So if someone is building processes or, they’re looking at something, it’s I wanna look at this really from our top performer, because we, what happens all the time is we go gravitate straight to the bottom performer and we’re like, okay if we build this process, then I don’t know, Sally’s probably not gonna be able to meet her quota. And I’m like, why are we focusing on Sally? And someone who is super objective and looking at things again, not from an emotional standpoint, and also being able to be a good communicator. And for example, we do still do video videos that are premiered every day at our morning huddles, and the entire team rates them. It’s almost like a focus group before each one. Even reminding there we’re critiquing the edit, not the editor, not the person who did it. We are critiquing the edit itself. And so really just looking for someone who can keep things very objective and also be able to poke holes in things. I think that is like challenging the status quo. And like, why has it been done this way forever? What if we tried it this way? So definitely a lot of characteristics there in terms of just making sure that things are. Are right. And looking at it even when someone says, Hey, I like to organize, or I like processes. That means something different to every person. It’s like the hotel question. And digging into that. And we test for that actually in our hiring process, before we even do hire someone of what is their ability to do this?

Sonya Palmer

Types of roles attract people who are very dedicated to quality. They like things to be correct, and you can very quickly micromanage via a checklist and try to sort of, basically make sure that an error never happens and you can’t errors are still gonna happen. Mistakes are still gonna happen. Of course.

Jessica Mogill

So the objective, I think is key is that they’re not going to attempt to micromanage via the processes that they’re creating.

Sonya Palmer

Exactly. Excellent. You mentioned Colby and the assessments that you use at Chris for those unaware. What is that in broad strokes? What do those numbers mean?

Jessica Mogill

Colby in quick, dirty terms is how you operate. So if you had the freedom to be yourself, how would you go about solving a problem? My natural inclination. You’re also an operator. This is a big assumption, but I would assume that your way of solving something is probably to gather information and organize that information. And then now I’m going to go make a plan. Some people, their natural inclination is to be like, I’ve got 50 ideas and I need to spit out all of my ideas an,d then I will go work. You’re like, I feel that

Sonya Palmer

exhausting. Yeah,

Jessica Mogill

Yes, exactly. Exactly. But all of them are strengths. And so when we have every candidate take this like we’re very clear they’re assessments, you cannot fail them. And then the print assessment is why you do the things that you do. And so that’s a lot more of like your culture, your upbringing like your motives, your motivations, things like that. And when I referenced that in saying an operations person, for example, one of my numbers is to be perfect.

Sonya Palmer

Correct. And right. so it’s a great person to have an operations

Jessica Mogill

But yeah, so we these they’re going to best operate because as much as we want Chris to be a great fit for them we want it to work both ways. And so we wanna make sure that they’re also going to be set up for success. And that’s really where I come back to before. Even when I said I’m so much more self-aware now I think when you interview someone and they do say something like, oh yes, I real processes and details. And then like their Colby comes back and it’s not that. I’m not saying that they said that maliciously, they just don’t know that about themselves.

Sonya Palmer

I think that oftentimes when you do assessments like that, you learn more about yourself than you.

Jessica Mogill

Oh, absolutely. We’ve had candidates that we’ve even rejected. Thank us for just even investing in those assessments. Cuz I’m like, go used these find your dream job based upon what you know are your strengths now

Sonya Palmer

So you use it in the hiring process.

Jessica Mogill

Yes. Yes. So we use it essentially from the start, I will not do a final interview with someone unless they have taken these assessments along with wonder lick. So we look at all three parts of the mind. So do they have the cognitive ability? What are their motivations and then how are they gonna problem solve this? And so we use it for role alignment and just making sure that we’ve got people in the right seats. And so I always go back to this example of one of our team members, probably about five years ago, she interviewed for marketing assistant and she took all of her assessments and Michael Laura, like she sales all the way she sales. I know she sales sells and she like did not even know that she was sales. We ended up bringing her in and she is. Probably in about it was under two years, for sure. She sold it for over 1.5 million. And it was just having the right person in the right seat. That’s the thing. And we love her. She’s gone back to Florida and opened her yoga studio. She’s doing her own thing randomly will text Michael, me, and she’s I had dreams last night about you guys setting targets and her and my ear, like all of this. But that was the thing. And like now, So successful, she’s launched her, like I said, her own business now and be able to see that. And she has that realization of herself too, of like now, who does she need to surround herself with to make her business work? I, I love that. And it shows how invaluable tools like this can be, because without them, it’s oh, I’m looking for this type of person. And then that person puts their hand up. It’s oh, that’s me. not them. . And then. then always go back. Like it’s not ill intent. It’s not malicious. Like some people just wanna help

Sonya Palmer

Yeah and it’s not just necessarily about disqualifying someone from a position, but you were able to plug them into different roles that they then Excel that. So it’s as though that’s them, then it’s not them.

Jessica Mogill

Exactly. And the way that Colby, I always explain this and I give them credit for this cuz they were the ones that broke it down. It’s trying to write your name with your non-dominant hand versus your dominant hand. And so I can know your Colby and your print and I can. Put you in a position where you get to write with your dominant hand and it comes naturally and it comes free and it’s more organized and it’s less stressful. Or I can put you in one where you’re just working against your grain and it’s painful and it’s messy and it’s slow. And it’s stressful. Like why do that? If you can know that about someone.

Sonya Palmer

Yes, that’s a perfect cuz. It’s not like you can’t do it. It’s just a lot more D.

Jessica Mogill

Yes.

Sonya Palmer

We know that women are drastically underrepresented in the legal industry – particularly at the executive level. With outside investment flooding the market soon the legal landscape is changing. This is a major focus of the upcoming Crisp conference in Atlanta. Jesica shares with us what to expect.

Jessica Mogill

We did the first one in 2018 and Michael, can’t do anything small. I think we started off saying, Hey, we’re gonna have 200. People there, we ended up with over 500 people there. We knew at this point when we decided to do this, like no one in the legal industry is asking for another legal conference. we were very aware of that. But what we did see was. They’re all on how to be a better lawyer, how to be a better the trials. But they had no focus on being a leader. They had no focus on building a team and how to grow and scale. There was no business of law essentially. And. Candidly people were in the back of the rooms, on their laptops. Like they’re just not, it was not an experience. And so we knew Hey, we can make this more engaging. We can make this more exciting. We’re gonna bring in people from the legal industry and beyond that’s the thing at the core of this. And my last profession, I was consulting and coaching, dentist, chiropractors, and plastic surgeons. It’s all the same like at the core of running a business, it’s all the same. And so when we decided to do this and we also said, this is a great platform for women, I think last year we did the women’s legal leaders panel. I don’t know any other conference that was like, we’re gonna do a women’s panel. And I will tell you very candidly. The feedback was polarizing because some people loved that. And then there were some men out there who said, this added no value to me. And you know what, we weren’t doing that for you. Yes, it’s true, but you know what? We’re willing to put ourselves out there anyway, because at the end of the day, like we, you our very first year we had Jan Dells. She did that. Judy Smith was there and we wanna give a platform for that. And with the summit to be able to talk about leadership, culture, operations, infrastructure, things that. No one else is talking about it. And so just really being able to create that experience as well. Michael’s given away cars left and right. Sometimes I open the Tesla app, what is happening right now? Yes. And where, what other event are you going to that literally during the event, there’s like a DJ. Yes. We’re having an after-party. Yes. We’re having other things, but like we wanted to focus this event every year on experience and it’s like, how do we make it bigger and better? And just continue to give a platform to people.

Sonya Palmer

Yes, you guys do an incredible job and please keep having the female-led female-led panels. How often have women had to sit in an audience and extract value from an all-male

Jessica Mogill

Thank you. Yes. Yes. And I don’t see any women leaving feedback saying I couldn’t relate because it was a man.

Sonya Palmer

no, I don’t know that then anyone’s ever said that, so I, yes, please keep doing that. and I, yes, I completely agree with you on like lawyers. Attorneys’ professional services in general doctors, dentists, plumbers, and electricians. They are, they’re great at their craft. Not necessarily running a business and they don’t know how and accounting and marketing and hiring.

Jessica Mogill

Building a team. No one tells you what to do when I came in, candidly, Michael had no process. There was nothing and it’s yeah, I just hired cuz I like them or because they said this and it’s no, you can do so much better. And then it’s like you said, even with all the capital coming in is your firm and investable at the end of the day?

Sonya Palmer

Yes. Yes. Super important. Which women speakers are you looking forward to the most? Mm, Great.

Jessica Mogill

So we have not released everyone. I will say we are bringing back and I’m very excited to bring back Cy Wakeman. She was one of our highest-rated speakers last year. If no one has read our books, like they, 1000% changed my life and changed the way that we run our business. And so is always wonderful to hear. he’s been on the podcast twice. Like she we’re, we are very aligned in really the way that we view things in terms of business and culture.

Sonya Palmer

I love that. I love it. What’s next for you and Crisp.

Jessica Mogill

We are always looking for ways to expand our ecosystem and just to put that into contacts. And so we always want our ecosystem to be growing and developing with that. And so then we went to marketing, then we went to coaching, and to be completely honest, we look forward to sharing our next addition to the ecosystem at the summit. But there will be an addition to the ecosystem coming

Sonya Palmer

Amazing. So we can look forward to that. I love it.

Jessica Mogill

Yes.

Sonya Palmer

Excellent. I got one more for you.

Jessica Mogill

All right.

Sonya Palmer

What are you reading right now?

Jessica Mogill

I am reading Michael’s second book to be completely honest.

Sonya Palmer

nice.

Jessica Mogill

somehow I was not fully in that process with the first book and with this book, I am heading down, completely in it. We’re like reviewing a. Two three chapters a week. And so that has consumed my life right now, but I am very excited about this book.

Sonya Palmer

Whatever your vision – set up systems. When the clients come streaming in, your firm will be able to handle the load. Work in your zone of genius – and delegate the rest. Chris had this cta in his script – not sure if you want the same. It’s included here just in case. For 25% off of your ticket, to the Crisp summit in Atlanta go to Crisp Summit dot com and enter the promo code RANKINGS. This is one not to miss. A huge thank you to Jessica for sharing her story and unbelievable insights with us today. You’ve been listening to LawHER with, me, Sonya Palmer. If you found this content insightful, inspiring, or just made you smile, please share this episode with the trailblazer in your life. For more about Jessica check out our show notes. While you’re there, please leave us a review or a five-star rating. It goes a long way for others to discover the show. I’ll see you next week on LawHER where we’ll shed light on how another of the brightest and boldest women in the legal industry climbed to the top of her field.

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