121. Sam Mollaei, Legal Funnel — Building Blocks: Create a Virtual, Automated and Scalable Law Firm

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When it comes to scaling virtual law firms, Sam Mollaei is the go-to guy. In five years, he has founded and grown 3 multi-million dollar virtual law firms, earned over 3,000 5.0 star Google reviews, earns over 7-figures annually and grew his caseload from 23 in his first year to over 12,000. Founder of Legal Funnel, Sam shares with us his formula for success. We cover what it takes to build a law firm – or three – that are automated, virtual and scalable.

There is so much to unpack in this episode. For more about Sam and how to replicate his results, look for his YouTube channel and forthcoming book of the same name: Virtual Law Firm Secrets. Visit Legal Funnel to learn more about mastering virtual firm ownership.

What’s in This Episode:

  • Who is Sam Mollaei?
  • Why are the two largest leverage points content and technology?
  • How did Sam go from 23 to 7,000 clients in five years?
  • What three essential elements go into setting up a scalable virtual law firm?
  • What is a legal funnel?
  • What tools are best suited to set them up?
  • What goes into an amazing client experience in light of technology and automation?
  • Why are Google reviews and the actions after a case settlement so important?

Transcript

Sam Mollaei

I made a rule for myself only do scalable actions. And then when I started doing those scalable actions, That’s when really I was able to duplicate myself in duplicate my results. And then ever since then my first three or four years, I was able to quadruple my results.

Chris Dreyer

For personal injury firms looking to automate and scale their business, the process can seem daunting. But following an existing process can lead to wild success.

Sam Mollaei

When people don’t know how to act in act when they’re in unfamiliar situations that people take cues from other people. And that’s the same situation for your potential clients. When they’re trying to decide whether they trust enough to hire you or not, is this law firm legit or not? They will always Google you and they will look at your reviews.

Chris Dreyer

You’re listening to Personal Injury Mastermind, where we give you the tools you need to take your personal injury practice to the next level. Sam Mollaei is the founder of three virtual law firms, and just five years, he’s earned over 3000 google five-star reviews, seven figure earnings and a caseload that went from 23 files. Over 7,000. Sam is at the cutting edge of scaling law firms. Explosive growth requires a specific formula to get right. Mad technology marketing scientists, and lawyers. Sam shares with us, his tried and tested method in detail on today’s episode. I’m your host, Chris Dreyer, founder and CEO of Rankings.io. We help elite personal injury attorneys dominate first page rankings with search engine optimism. Being at the forefront of marketing is all about understanding people. So let’s get to know our guest. Here’s Sam Mollaei, founder of Mollaei Law.

Sam Mollaei

While I was waiting for my bar results, I was contemplating I’m like, do I really want to be a lawyer?. That was the wrong time to start having those questions. But I realized that there’s a difference between traditional lawyer and being a non-traditional virtual lawyer. And I conference that world. And that’s the world that I’ve been in last seven years. Hopefully we’ll be talking about that and building your own path and building your own in a way of running a law firm is kind of my thing.

Chris Dreyer

Despite your wild success in the marketing world, you just, you don’t identify as a marketer consultant. You’re a lawyer. And so let’s talk about Mollaei in your first year, you retained 23 clients, tell us about that and and what you started to learn.When I started my law firm, I had no idea I had no mentor. I had no idea how to get clients at all. So I created my first website taught myself SEO content, marketing, how to create the perfect websites, all that stuff. And I basically had to teach myself how to how to figure this out.

Chris Dreyer

And then your second year, You really unlocked in a unique method of case acquisition. So what happened from the 23 to like this new tactic?

Sam Mollaei

Yeah, my first year, I didn’t remember exactly to the dollar, how much made $18,410 or so, and then it was until the, until I read this book by Tim Ferriss, the Four Hour Workweek, which I think is a game changer for a lot of young attorneys basically exposed me to three key principles that I was talking about first, is it virtual? Model a virtual business, which I essentially just turn into a virtual law firm, like great running a laptop and running a law firm from your laptop, second automation or automated business. So I applied it for my own law firm. How can I make this law firm running its own? And third is we’ll be talking about scalable.How can you be able to scale yourself out so that at the law firm doesn’t depend on you? So for example, practically is maybe if there’s a way that I could set up clients, but necessarily needed to talk to. So how would I be able to create these funnels and videos and things that I built to duplicate myself over and over? So I started focusing on more of those scalable actions, started creating a funnel so that every time a lead would want to sign up for me, I would go for them to watch this video, and then I would get them scheduled then on a call. So that so I made a rule for myself only do scalable actions. And then when I started doing those scalable actions, That’s when really I was able to duplicate myself in duplicate my results. And then ever since then my first three or four years, I was able to quadruple my results. 18 K in 90 K 10. Now beyond that 360, et cetera, et cetera, and doing it over and over. And now my growth is about two to 2.5 X every year with again, the same principles, scalable, automating the virtual.

Chris Dreyer

So the first thing that came to mind and have you listened to, or you read a Naval Ravikant?

Sam Mollaei

Oh, yeah. I love Neval. Yeah. Okay.

Chris Dreyer

So Neval, he, he talks about leverage, right? people leverage media, leverage technology. And the one that I think that you’ve really unlocked, that I’m excited to dig into is the technology and the AI. And just how fascinating that can be. As it is, as it applies to leverage. And it like to just hear your just overall thought process on those, the different forms of leverage they, before we jump in.

Sam Mollaei

Yeah. This actual video that Chris is talking about is actually a video that I shared with our legal fundamental shift students. I’m like, this is such a high value. If you really understand this video, it will be a game-changing for your life. And what he shares is that you want to find the leverage in your life. And in this day, remember we were making the speed up 2022. What are the two biggest. It’s two things, either content or tech content, if you’re by making videos or writing content or, you could have hundreds of people consuming that. So one action for many applets for many results. Also tech is you create one tool. One thing that could bring about 10 or a hundred X results from it. So that’s the epiphany, your biggest leverage in life they can have is either content or tech. If you can use both or use one of them to be able to again, grow really fast, that’s where it’s at.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah. And expand on that. Like this podcast itself has leverage, right? It’s distribution, it’s tech. And as opposed to me talking to you, no one, just me and Sam having a conversation where we’re getting this, share it with, 10,000 subscribers every single month. And it’s really exciting. by year five, you generate over 7,000 clients. So this technique that we’re talking about is, you went from 23 to over 7,000, you created multiple six, seven figure virtual law firms like, so talk us, take us through this process. How did you go from 23 to 7,000 clients , take us through this process.

Sam Mollaei

I’ve basically found patterns in creating a successful law firm The first set part is just generating clients, client generation, for me, I always think about it as three parts. Is the traffic basically where your leads are coming from, then there’s the system that converts them a call it the funnel. And the third aspect is like the automation or automated ways to be able to follow up with your leads to turn them into clients. So client generation is all about that. I go find the top source that brings me the most clients. Usually for me, I like paid ads, go crank that up. Then go second is send them to a system or way to be able to convert them into leads and clients. The third is used to have some kind of automation system again, to follow up with them. So I set that. The next is serving the clients. Or sometimes I like to refer out the clients out if I can, for that, I use a lot of virtual assistants and basically building out a virtual team. I do sometimes still have directors and managers in-house, but most of the virtual staff, when it comes to signing up the clients, serving the clients, doing parts of the marketing cloud generation gathering, Google reviews, all that stuff is all VAs, these days, virtual assistants. And the third part is, which is crucial for me is collecting as many reviews and Google reviews as I possibly can. But each of these law firms, and if I can set up these three parts, bring in the clients, serve the clients and get a good Google reviews. I’m able to replicate this over and over, across different practice types, but it’s actually the same thing, right? It’s the same thing over and over. And I was able to duplicate that over and over have about six or seven active virtual law firms are consistently every day signing up clients, serving the clients or referring to. Getting a lot of Google reviews from people over and over. while that’s going on, I’m also as a passion project, I teach this to other lawyers about how they can also do this for themselves. And now I’m seeing success stories from our students that are doing the same exact thing, understanding the system, creating it for themselves and to see the results of this.

Chris Dreyer

And this is so different. So there’s several things I want to pick out here. It’s because first you, you refer to this, remote law firms, this virtual law firm not even route virtual, right? So versus the traditional brick and mortar. So first of all, let’s talk about the advantages and disadvantages of the virtual law firm. And how do you distinguish that? You said you had six, so they different entities, different, S-corps or however you filed like how do you distinguish these what are they?

Sam Mollaei

I usually first want to make sure that I’m generating the clients for it. So I make sure I got the client generation down then, or if I already know that I already know what it is, then at that point, then I go create a separate entity, but yes, they are. All of them. Separate entities. That’s one commonality. And under the commonalities that all have one director, basically a business manager, director, implementer, whatever you want to call it, one person in charge of the business, make sure that the team is doing what they’re supposed to be doing. We have a goal everybody’s sticking to their goals, et cetera, in the businesses growing.

Chris Dreyer

Absolutely. Okay. And then let’s, and then we’ll hit each of those pillars, right? So the biz dev the client experience and then the review. So let’s talk about the business. let’s explain the basics. What’s illegal funnel? Let’s talk about the basics when it comes to the biz-dev side.

Sam Mollaei

So when I talk about funnels, it’s just the concepts. Not necessarily, you need to send people to like a particular funnel or things like that. Just clarify that because the market, I think is misunderstood. It definitely like it has to be this particular looking page and things like that. So the next thing funnel again, the first part of the funnel is to just collect your leads information. Okay. That’s the. Second thing is to nurture or to to build a relationship, get these leads. How do I do that? I always want to send them to a particular video, usually to get nurtured to, for them to hear from the attorney. Here’s how we can help you. You probably have this problem. Here’s how we can help you look all that. I’ll just people that you’ve helped in the past. And the next component is to drive them to your, to get your call to action. What do you want them to do. For law firm owners is one of two things either. Give me a call right now or go book a time with me right now. There’s nothing else you want them to do. And then you basically have your series of emails, usually, or texts. That’s sending them back to this same process. Go watch this video go, give me a call or book a call, come watch this video and go book a color or give me a call. And that’s over and over. That’s basically the funnel summarize how to go implement it.

Chris Dreyer

Funnels don’t need to be built from scratch. From Russell Brunson and click funnels to Active Campaign. Certain applications are best suited to different parts of the process. Sam dives, into the tools he prefers and why specialization matters.

Sam Mollaei

Yes. I believe in using tools that are very good at certain things. There are some tools on the market that do different things. I like kind of specialty tools, so yes, I do use ClickFunnels for my funnels for the pages inside the funnels. I use Active Campaign for my emails. I use a lot of Loom to record the videos and be able to use the videos to my advantage. But there also, again, I mentioned there are certain tools, LA Maddix, Cleo those things could also help out to be able to serve those patients.

Chris Dreyer

Absolutely. So that’s fantastic. And I’ve used many of those, a Loom I’m a huge fan of Loom for the humanizing component the one thing here on the biz dev side that I’ve always found challenging is particularly for the PI audience, right? If it’s divorce or bankruptcy, you can educate them. And, people are making that consideration. You can get collect information a little bit different, how does this play into say the PI side of things where we don’t know who’s going to get an auto accident or is it maybe you’ve identified interest and you do know, like how does that play into this?

Sam Mollaei

I look at it two ways either. It’s direct marketing. Let’s go make sure that we are where ever they are, when people are searching for us or where, when they have an accident. When they’re trying to get the question answered, that’s be there. That’s usually the best because the intent is there. The urgency is there. They’re there when they need it. That’s one that’s I’m sure Chris, your company does is helps PI lawyers do exactly that, but which, by the way, if you’re a PI Lawyer and you guys have been listening to Chris for a while. I would use this moment to use this motivation to go at least talk to Chris at the very least talk, get some information, see what’s out there. What should I do? Should I do this? Should I not? And I know Chris, you probably have those conversations, even if you cannot help them right then and now at least to give them good advice. So definitely go talk to, so thank you, sir. Second thing is, you gotta play the long-term game. Okay. The law, the more you can play the long-term game, the more successful you will be in life in general. It’s that eppfiany that I had, not just in business, but also in relationships in building being a good spouse. And when it comes to your content, when it comes to anything you could think about again, if you’re playing the long term, you have a good long-term mindset and your actions are long-term minded then you will be successful. So if that’s the case, go build a community of a very particular types of people. And that committee is usually people that you get along with. So it gives you, it gives some ideas of whatever your passions are. And I just say you like poker. So go see if we can build an online comunity of poker players like horseback riding, go create an online community of horseback riders. Go create that community and build an email database or an even better than email database. Build builder long-term relationship with these people. Be a good person. Provide good value. Don’t necessarily, you don’t necessarily need to talk about you not being a PI lawyer all the time. It’s a misconception, just be a good person. I can actually learn this myself and my, one of the first things I did it was, I learned about the power of having your own email list, start creating my own, gathered all the emails that I could. And I started sending the people in my email list, all about business formations to LLCs. Once a month, I would send those emails. I would get like a decent number of open rates and this number of replies. Wait a minute. I’m like, wait a minute, let me switch it up. Let me start talking about life. Let me share some positive quotes. Do this other stuff. And I started doing that. That’s when I got a lot more engagement, a lot more replies. And also when I noticed that would go on meet people in person, they would always mention, yeah, I love your newsletter, all that stuff. Your content and your community, they built it doesn’t necessarily have to be about you being a PI. Just be a good person that also happens to be our peer PI lawyer. So I would say played both games, be to do some direct marketing, kind of things with Chris and his company, and also go to play the long-term game with building an online community of the people that you would add to their life and add value to their life.

Chris Dreyer

First of all, thank you for the compliment. And I think that’s such a great piece of advice that you mentioned in terms of just be a human being. Like I think where I see this go wrong on, on is on social media a lot where many firms will just talk about, have you been in an auto accident? Just the level of law, but when you humanize yourself and you bring in a picture of the pet or your family members or the different things in the community, it just, it makes you more likable. They can associate with you with with you more. And I like all of those recommendations that you mentioned. once you’ve captured these individuals, right? You built a community, you built the biz dev you’re doing your branding, your awareness, and you get that client. So you talked about the three stages. So you want to nurture that client experience, what goes into an amazing client experience, particularly with technology and automation?

Sam Mollaei

It’s streamlining that process that you’re able to serve the clients with the best, most clear communication, and to keep theclient updated on exactly where they are in their case. Okay. So let’s break that down first. You need to, in your CRM, you need to break down the client’s cycle or what the client process is. First I need to get together a full intake. Then I need to gather the documents. Then maybe I need to if need maybe interview the client and to start the paperwork, then I need the lawyer to the clients who reviewed the paperwork. Then I need to follow that paperwork. Then I need to get a read for a response. Then reviewed the response, whatever the, whatever that is, breakdown your entire process from a to Z, how to from the client signs up to when the client gets their check, what that looks like. So break that down. Second is you want to have managers or directors that are in charge of the different stages. So let’s just say one person just for onboarding new clients, you have onboard manager, you have the person who’s in charge of falling, and then you have the person in charge of like disbursements and collection and things like that. So break it down into divisions, create goals for each of the divisions. And you want to make sure every single one of those steps is, has very clear protocols and instructions for your team to be able to serve this. And also for those cons to be tracked where there are in the stage. That’s like really actively like building that up that system one time and make sure that’s smooth and operating is really crucial. And second thing also a lot of PI lawyers are struggling with having their having their clients updated on where their clients are. You don’t want the client to come and say, Hey, where are we at? With our file. . You want to be proactive. You want to have a client success manager whose only job is that once a week you would go through this list of clients and just tell them where they are in their case. Even if there’s no status, you just suddenly send an email. Hey, just wanted to check in with you, hope you had a great weekend. We’ll be at a great weekend. This is wanting to update you. We’re still, our next thing is still happening in June, but you have nothing to do until then, when clients get a status update practically from you, but are you asking them for them? That really is gives them ease of mind. They don’t stop thinking about it and they will be much happier throughout the process and at the end, and you will get much happier clients and a lot of five star Google reviews at the end. Yeah.

Chris Dreyer

I think that the thing that I say here is you’re teaching them not to be crazy. So often the clients get, get crazy when they just.

Sam Mollaei

Exactly The you know, FUD stands for Chris’ fear, uncertainty and doubt. That’s when bad things happen. So make sure your clients don’t have any FUD.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah. And I liked the aspect that you said you had a client success manager. It really reminds me of a SASS like you’re given this overall experience and teaching them how to work in within your processes too. And, especially if you’re using technology or loom and communicate. So I think that’s a, that’s really powerful. I like the fact that you’ve identified, mapped out these different stages and the criminal defense firms going to be different than a PI firm and all the different stages that that you encounter. And I think that’s super smart on the CRM side. Is there any CRM work? Is there a particular CRM that you recommend is that, liquefy a file vine a, is there any particular that you lean into?

Sam Mollaei

I’m also in a very particular cool situation to be in because I get a lot information about what’s working for lawyers what’s not. And what I found out is if there was one really good CRM, I would have already known by now, but there isn’t. So what I found out just little clues is ideally there are some certain strands that are good for certain practice types. There are some that are particularly good with for PI I don’t want to name particular ones that are good for periodic because I’m not a hundred percent sure myself. But from what I know, I’ll just put out their Case Peer Wellmatics, things like that. But also, so that’s that, so practice specific and then general ones that generally I know are necessarily good are Cleo Law Maddix. Those, I would say it’s two, they’re like. The front runners right now.

Chris Dreyer

Sure. we’ve heard a lot about those as well. And yeah, so I don’t want to just focus all there because a lot of times I get this on the project management side as owning an SEO agency and they’re like which project management tool I’m like they all work.You just have to utilize the tool effectively, within their parameters and capabilities. I love the communication at these different milestones, the client success managers, a different division heads that are interacting and, the director that oversees everything. So then we got the last side the evangelism the review side. So let’s talk about, first of all, let’s in your words, why are reviews important? There are many reasons why they’re important, but in your words, why are they important? And why is the, the actions after the case settled so important?

Sam Mollaei

Actually I taught this exact thing to our legal funnel students today about reviews, the power of reviews. So first of all, Google reviews are by far the most important way, more important than Facebook, all Yelp reviews. So just make sure you’re collecting reviews on Google. I’m sure Chris you talked about this all the time, right? And your SEO, Google ads, Google local service ads, Google my business, all that stuff relies on Google. That’s one second is the idea is when people don’t know how to act in act when they’re in unfamiliar situations that people take cues from other people. And that’s the same situation for your potential clients. When they’re trying to decide whether they trust enough to hire you or not, is this law firm legit or not? They will always Google you and they will look at your reviews. And that’s why good reviews is so crucial because reviews is basically the biggest factor to getting your potential clients, your leads to turn them into clients. Nothing is more convincing than your reviews. So it’s crucial, especially in this online age to have a lot of good Google reviews and actually have a really good system for be able to collect a lot of Google reviews and VLDL to share with your audience today. And actually I have over 3,227 Google reviews as a ton of this recording is one of the highest in the nation. And that’s what they mean, a small team. If everybody’s a small team and it’s all attributed. To the system that hopefully I’ll be sharing with you right now. Yeah,

Chris Dreyer

Let’s just talk about it because first of all, that’s a beat from the SEO perspective that makes me like, that’s very powerful. It says on Google local’s page, in terms of prominence that review count and score is factored into visibility. And I totally agree in terms of those social proof and trust, elements. So let’s talk about that. That really excites me. Let’s talk about the review acquisition strategy there.

Sam Mollaei

Great. So it’s two things. One is the actual script that I’ll be sharing with you. And second is in some kind of automation component that will automatically send these requests over and over until they actually do. The first is the script. most lawyers, they just sent, as soon as the, they want to review, they just send a, an email or text and to say can you leave me a review? And then they sent out the link for the review. Don’t do that. It’s a mistake because it’s too much of an ask. It’s very hard. People are lazy, inherently lazy these days. Nobody wants to do anything. It doesn’t matter that you’ve been such an amazing lawyer for them for the past two years, people are still having a really hard time to do it, to do that for you. And since that, do you want to break down the ask into two asks first, ask for permission to say, Hey, if I send you a link, can you leave your review? Let them say yes first.. Then you send them a link to leave a review. So you break down the ask and it’s very subtle. And most people are like, okay, that’s it. I’m like, yeah, that makes a huge difference. Get people to say yes first then you send them a link. So I’ll share the actual script with you and whoever that’s watching this on YouTube later can see this on the screen. So the first email is essentially it says this, and I’ll try to read off for people that are listening in right now. If you’re listening to this, go pause this and go right this down. Because it, this works really well. Again, I’ve been able to use this exact script for, to collect over 3000 Google reviews. So here it is. The first word is personalized, says their name. So John, I’d like to ask you for a favor. Would you please mind taking a few moments to write a review for me? Your comment will help others know what to expect when they’re looking for the service I offer. And here’s the call to action. May I please send you a link to leave a review if that’s okay with you? Question mark. So you just ask them, Hey, is it okay if I send you a link then let them say yes. I don’t mind here. Yeah, sure. Send me the link then once there’s a brief reply back then you say, great. Thank you so much. Leave a review here. You’ll link out to your Google review and then you say, I really appreciate you doing this. I’ll be sure to return the favor, when you need assistance in the future. Thats it. Ask a very particular way. And then the second part that I mentioned is some kind of automation. So I use a tool called Mixmax, which is an email automation tool they use instead of Gmail is by the way, the whole other conversation, everybody should be on Gmail. Nobody should be using outlook these days. For a lot of reasons, I could talk about it for the 30 minutes about this, but if you’re inside of Gmail, go look up a tool called Mixmax and able to create Mixmax sequences. For these two emails that says that basically repeats this ask over and over. So this one will be called review one sequence until they say, yes, I will review. Then I will send them this review two sequence over and over. So that basically it does the followup for you. And it increases your chance of like usually like a 10% chance of people being reviewed. This is anywhere from 30 to 50% of your clients leaving your review.

Chris Dreyer

There’s so much in this. It seems simple, but there’s so much psychology here. So first let’s talk about the, getting them to say yes. Why is that critical as opposed to send them the link.

Sam Mollaei

And whenever you want people to do something it’s basically get people to microcommit. Before they do it. So if they say, yes, they’ll do it. Now they have to follow through. And then the first ask is also much easier. Yes. A response of yes is a lot easier than actually them going and doing it. So actually you can apply the same as you mentioned, like a psychology and, this technique to other things, if you need anything done. And I also does, I’m sure, Chris, you probably do this for asking for reviews and link building. You have some public techniques in there for doing this. So yeah. Getting people to microcommit before you actually get them to do it.

Chris Dreyer

Most people will micro commit because saying yes to the first ask and not falling through with the will go against their integrity. Getting the first yes maybe the challenge turning off some clients and converting others, Sam digs into how he approaches frequency of asks.

Sam Mollaei

Something that I debated for a long time. And two schools of thought either be aggressive and zealous or be a little bit, quote, unquote, nicer, a little bit more conservative, make sure that nobody gets offended or annoyed thing. So in life it usually pays off to be a little bit more zealous, a little bit more aggressive be more proactive. So over time I lean towards asking more. Doing more, doing, sending more followups, even if it comes at the expense of being a little bit annoying to a small percentage of the population. So I’m all for being a little more aggressive. And it’s not the end of the world. It’s just through email. If you need to clarify something, you can just do it through email, but I like being more aggressive. I usually the way that I can have balances early on in that sequence, I usually do. Once every day and then after like email three or four, then I did every two, three, every five, every seven, every 10 days after that. So it a, I don’t know what kind of chart that is, but over in the beginning it’s like very frequent then.

Chris Dreyer

So one of the things I like about getting the micro-commitment, is it also gives you an opportunity for them to vent. So if they didn’t have a good experience, you’re not sending them a review link for them to write a one-star review. So they like, yeah, of course. I’ll write your review then it’s probably likely that they’re going to give you a good review, but if they’re like, no, blah, blah, blah, had this bad experience. Then you could maybe flip them into an evangelist and it gives a little bit of an opportunity as opposed to going straight into the kill right away. I think a lot of our audience are probably like automation, let me send this to my marketing person, like where, so where do they start? What can you do to help? Let’s talk about you and the audience that may want to implement some of these practices into their firm.

Sam Mollaei

Sure. I already have my own ongoing, law firms that I create, make sure that they’re bringing in clients, serve to clients, et cetera. But on the side, I’d really as a passion project. ’cause I used to be a tutor is to have there still have a successful tutoring company. My passion is teaching and sharing and giving ultimately. So I created a program called Legal Funnel where I share these exact systems that I’m currently implementing for myself. Everything that I share is based on things, not just based on things that I heard based on things that I implement first for myself. I’m the Guinea pig. Once I get results of it, then I go straight out with our students. It’s basically online culture. Where I share this in a very systematic, thought out way, with all the templates on implementation, we also have a support team that helps you implement this. And everything is well thought out to help you implement the same exact things for yourself. When it comes to two things, one is getting clients and two is automating the law firms. So that means all the systems and all the virtual assistants and all the backend stuff to be able to, for you to be able to automate the entire. So they’re able to run your law firm as a business so that the law firm doesn’t run you run the law firm essentially.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah. And so what was the domain again? It was legal funnels that legal funnel.com.

Sam Mollaei

Yeah. Legal funnel.com or just Google it. Go on YouTube, go on Facebook anywhere you want to search for it. You have to find it. I’m all by giving again. Everything that I do is based on teaching and string value. So go to find plenty of value upfront. And if it sounds intriguing enough, come book a call and speak to us, the ongoing program that thankfully of 350 lawyers who have already joined a program very successful. And every time I do it, every time I teach it always gets constantly refined. I learn new things. I talk to hundreds of lawyers gather all the Intel, feed it back to everybody what’s working what’s not for everybody. So yeah, if you’re interested, please book a call with us.

Chris Dreyer

Fantastic. Yeah. And again, this is leverage guys. So instead of getting on the hamster wheel and trying to hire employee after employee, this is another form of leverage to get the work done. And it allows for different type of scale that maybe, the human component may miss. So I’ll definitely tell you to reach out to Sam, couple of final questions here, Sam. Pie in the sky. what’s some of your big goals. What are your big goals for your firm?

Sam Mollaei

So my actively, I’m just working on creating as many enterprises as I can different different law firms ideally multi-state or national law firms, if I can, because then it makes the marketing easy, create those, grow those, make sure that they’re, self-sustainable, they’re running on their own, which is literally what I’m doing right now. On top of that, have a big vision and know how legal funnel. we cna help many lawyers hunting, so many lawyers need this. So hopefully be able to build this out to, reach tens of thousands of lawyers to to share these techniques and be able to work smart, be able to, again, automate the law firm, feel to make sure it’s virtual and scalable on that stuff. I’m actually also about to hopefully soon release the book called Virtual Law Firm Secrets. go look to see if you can find the book. Maybe go on Amazon. Hopefully by the time it gets published virtual law firm secrets, where I’ll be able to share more of these lessons with everybody.

Chris Dreyer

Fantastic. And we’ll link that up as well. what’s next for legal funnel?

Sam Mollaei

Serving more clients because we’ve already proved the model. We know what works, what helps lawyers, how we can help our lawyers. So really scale up and just reach more lawyers and, and it’s not just PI lawyers. So we worked with we do Pi right now was our second most popular practice type, but we also work with estate planning business, criminal defense, immigration, all the top practice areas, as the principles are all the same, set up the same systems and be able to automate it, all that stuff is you’ll to get a lot of value from any of those practice types.

Chris Dreyer

Fantastic. Sam. Thanks so much for coming on the show.

Sam Mollaei

Thank you. Thank you so much, Chris. And Chris, I’m going to give you prompts because I know you’ve been at it for for how many years, Chris?

Chris Dreyer

Ah, geez, 15, 15 years.

Sam Mollaei

That’s consistency then. Playing the long-term game because I, for both of us, I’m sure we get exposed to a lot of different marketers in different people that are in this field are sore short term minded. I see so many companies do you see, come and go. And especially in the last 15 years, and now I’m like starting to see that, but now I find that long-term people and play the long-term game with them, make good friends with them because I know I’ll be here 30 years, 40 years. It doesn’t matter how much money I make. I’ll still be doing the same thing. So yeah, find those long-term people and I’m going to give you props and hopefully we both those people. Keep and have a good long-term relationship together and hopefully be able to meet each other in person as well. for personal injury lawyers, building successful funnels is a two-pronged approach. Direct marketing will make sure that you are where the client is when they have an accident. The second create a community with specific types of people online, develop a long-term relationship with them. Be a good person that happens to be a personal injury lawyer by providing value. Established systems from client intake to check disbursement that are consistent and replicable. Once the client is secured, be proactive with communication, let them know where their file is in the process. Ask for reviews. Repeat. I’d like to think Sam Mollaei from Mollaei law for sharing a story with us, and I hope you gained some valuable insights from the conversation. You’ve been listening to Personal Injury Mastermind. I’m Chris Dreyer.. If you like this episode, leave us a review. We’d love to hear from our listeners. I’ll catch you on next week’s PIMM with another incredible guest and all the strategies you need to master personal injury marketing.

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