92. Marc Anidjar, Anidjar & Levine The Secret Sauce for Managing and Marketing

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From perfecting the yellow pages promotion strategy, to mastering the modern marketing Holy Trinity of radio, TV and web, Marc Anidjar has always been interested in making the most of advertising. As his practice, Anidjar & Levine, has gone from strength to strength, Marc has been able to experiment with his marketing strategy, while also developing his managerial style for an ever expanding team.

In todays episode, Marc shares with us his dos and donts for marketing a law firm, his approach to managing a growing practice, and how relationships play a big role in both.

Whats In This Episode

  • Who is Marc Anidjar?
  • How does Marc adapt his management style to suit his staff and optimize team performance?
  • What is Marcs ‘Holy Trinity’ approach to marketing?
  • How can strong relationships with your advertisers assist growth?
  • Why does Marc recommend buying advertising in cash rather than accumulating debt?
  • What factors should you consider when deciding where, when and how to expand your practice?

Transcript

Marc Anidjar

It’s all about relationships. And to me, I think once there’s a friendly relationship, it’s very hard for that person to not want to do the best for you.

Chris Dreyer

Your advertising team is key to growing your law firm. So creating trust with them is critical.

Marc Anidjar

The more there’s an intimate relationship with the advertiser and the more it feels like a partnership and not just like a customer, they’re more inclined to try to help you or make sure that you do right.

Chris Dreyer

You’re listening to Personal Injury Mastermind, the show where elite personal injury attorneys and leading edge marketers give you exclusive access to growth strategies for your firm. As the managing partner of the personal injury law firm Anidjar & Levine, Marc Anidjar understands the art of consumer engagement. Marc and I sat down to discuss the key components of strategic company expansion, the significance of market saturation, as well as the importance of brand association when appealing to consumer demand. I’m your host, Chris Dreyer, founder and CEO of rankings.io. We help elite personal injury attorneys dominate first page rankings with search engine optimization. An important first step for any lawyer is to really understand the people around them, so let’s get to know our guest. Here’s Marc Anidjar, managing partner at Anidjar & Levine Personal Injury Lawyers.

Marc Anidjar

I never wanted to be a lawyer. I actually wanted to be a chef. You know, I always enjoyed cooking and I wanted to cook and that was what my passion was. And my father was like, listen, that doesn’t really pay well. And on top of that you’re like working every single holiday, but he made a deal. He’s like, listen, if you want to be a chef, go to law school, get your law degree, because I had already applied to law school and got in. And he’s like, if you still don’t want to do it after you graduate, then I’ll help you open up a restaurant. So to me, it was an opportunity to try to get to where I would want to go to. But, I’ve always been a person who took charge, you know, whenever there was like organizing, either parties in college or, getting our friends on vacations or doing that, how is the guy that was in charge of everyone, co-leading all the money, getting everyone to sign up. So I’ve always been a problem. And I think that kind of, I didn’t realize how well that played into what we do for a living that I think as a lawyer, all you’re doing is taking other people’s problems, internalizing them and finding a solution for them. So I think that’s what kind of migrated me into law. So I go to law school, I graduate, I get my first job at Terry Rosenblum’s office. And I just hit the ground running. And the management side of things that I picked up on is my father was a businessman like an entrepreneur by trade. He owned a jewelry stores when he was younger. Then he owned a chain of sporting goods stores at some times. So there was a lot of times in his life where he tried different businesses. And I remember in the eighties, he had a chain of sporting goods stores in downtown Miami. And I had to go to every single store and batch out the credit cards, count all the cash and do the profit and loss for every store. And I’m upstairs in his office and I’m doing the profit and loss, and one of the profit and losses was we lost money that day. So I’m like, what do you mean you lost money that day? And he’s like, well, there’s no guarantee that you make money, that you have to average out the month. So I think that was one of the life lessons that I took from, learning how to be a business operator in comparison to just being an attorney. So I think when you took those two modalities of being very structured and by the numbers and being a business operator, and then combine that with some problem solving skills, the rest has been history. So we say.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah, that’s fantastic. So there’s school that you go to attend and then there’s school at home and like what you’re actually learning doing. The other thing is I talked to a lot of attorneys and they struggle with the business aspect. So they get in with ‘Hey, I can practice the law. I understand the law, I’m a technician’, but you’ve got that management side early on.

Marc Anidjar

So my dad had good times and bad times. My brother and my sister grew up when times were good. I grew up when times were bad and I had to take out student loans. So I saw what it was when, you know, my parents struggled and had to succeed and work twice as hard, even at an older age. Even in people that I’ve interacted with along the way in business, you always see people who were successful at one point and didn’t have success. So I think that taught me that you always have to be diligent and be prepared for the worst. I think that’s something that I’ve always looked on. Like whenever I’m talking to somebody, I’m like, okay, what’s the best case scenario. What’s the worst case scenario. I always want to know the extremes. And once I know the extremes that I can formulate a plan on, what’s the best thing to do. Like you said, you go to law school, you get trained in the language of law, the legalese on how to speak and write like a lawyer. But at the end of the day, it’s the practical skills of applying them through your daily interactions and doing what you do. And that’s what makes you who you are. So I agree that it’s like the law school gives you the degree and the license to practice, but at the end of the day, it’s the, on the job training that teaches you how to really be successful as a lawyer and as well as the.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah, that’s a great breakdown. So when you work for this firm, when was it you decided, ‘Hey, I’m going to hang my shingle’. Tell me about how you met your partner Glenn Levine. When did you guys decide it was time to go out on your own?

Marc Anidjar

So I always had the gift of gab. I think my first month of being an attorney, I went to a a function where there was doctors and lawyers interacting with each other. So I meet this one doctor. Me and him hit it off. And the next day he calls me and he’s like, ‘Hey, I have no business referring you this case, but you seem like a nice guy’. And he sends me this file and it happened to be a case where a guy lost a leg. And we literally settled that case for $3.2 million. So that was our first, my first big hit. And from day one, I was always an advertiser. I’m like, listen, I want to throw my cap in the advertising sphere. And back then when I’m not going to date myself, but it was the yellow pages and the yellow books. So that was before the apple iPhone. Blackberry was still around. And at that point my boss at the time was like, ‘listen, I don’t advertise. It’s not my thing’. It’s all like, he was more of like a conventional style attorney, but he said ‘if you want to do it, go ahead and do it’. So I took my first check and I bought the front cover of the yellow pages. And then I just snowballed from there. And I think within 18 months I’m sitting there and I had like 119 of my own cases and I’m like, all right, it’s time to go. So that was really a short transition of me working for someone to then transitioning to my own office.

Chris Dreyer

And, you know, we laugh about now the yellow pages, but back then everyone used yellow pages and that was everyone had that phone.

Marc Anidjar

Well, it’s funny the other day, like I was trying to find someone’s phone number and I’m like, I should dial 4 1 1 to see if it even exists, but we had to do a background search and we got the number of different way. Yeah. Look the mediums that we use from the past to where we are today. Yeah. It’s definitely got a lot, a much more simpler, but yeah, the yellow books was very effective in the way they did a mosaic staggered every city. So every city would drop at a different time. And every time the book would drop, let’s say in Pompano in Florida or in Delray or in Boca, you would see a natural bump in terms of the cases that were coming in every time those books dropped. So what you did was you bought all the books and staggered them over the year, and that way you were always busy. So that was just the business model.

Chris Dreyer

Absolutely. And it’s very smart and I’ve even heard of individuals like, comboing that with like magnets. So then you’re on your, that existing artifact and an individual’s house and it’s super smart, you know, let’s talk about, and then we’ll get back to marketing a little bit, but let’s talk about your role like this progression in your role. How has your role evolved? Like at the very beginning where you’re wearing a bunch of hats, maybe trying cases and litigating yourself to more like the owner, the CEO. Tell me about that progression.

Marc Anidjar

It’s like a weird claim to fame, but I’ve actually never taken a deposition or gone to court. So really the I’ve always been an office manager and I’ve been the managing partner of the firm in the sense that. There always had to be someone at home to answer the client’s complaints or deal with the problems to make sure that they got resolved. So when me and my partner, Glen partnered up, we met at a dolphins game, young guy about my age. We hit it off. He was a litigator. That was his expertise. What I brought to the table was I knew how to manage your file, like the right way. The way we divided the office structure in the beginning was you run the pre-suit department and pre-suit means anything before litigation, from initial signup of the client, facilitating getting them to the doctors, walking them through the insurance process of opening up all the claims and ultimately, hopefully to settlement. That would be the pre-suit phase of the case. If the case was impasse at that time and needed to go to litigation, then it would transfer over to his department. So that was really the division of labor that we structured in our office. That was very good because we never really stepped on each other’s toes. And as we just got busy. In the beginning I used to do my own secretarial work, and then as the advertising happen, then you start hiring staff and then you have to say, all right, what do we do to make sure the staff is doing what they’re supposed to do? So my old boss basically used to set telling me, you have to live and die by your markups, right? When he had an old system where there was post-its everywhere, you know, obviously now we have outlook and to do’s and followups and all the checklists that we need to do. So I think if you’re going to be good at anything, you gotta be organized. You have to have a system in terms of how you break apart your day. First thing in the morning, I come in, knock out my emails, texts, do everything I need to do midday. I review all my files and do all my med charts by afternoon. You know, if there’s any cases that need to be settled, if they need assistance in bills and balances. And lastly, end to the day before I leave, make sure every call gets returned. So I think by structuring your day in a way where every day you were handling a different portion of the office, That’s what allowed us to make sure that everyone was getting the same level of service, right? You don’t want one guy to get an amazing experience with Anna, John Levine, and then all of a sudden, another guy to ever get a phone call back and never get returned mail. And then he’s feeling that he’s being left on the side. So you want to make sure that whatever you do, you do it consistently.

Chris Dreyer

There’s so many takeaways there. I was thinking of Dan Sullivan, Who Not How. So you have your who’s that, that if you want to go fast, you find your who’s. If you want to go linear and slow, you think about how and the other thing I was thinking about, and I wasn’t going to take it this direction, but a lot of what you just said reminds there’s this book I by Sean Whalen, it’s called, I think it’s called Make Shit Happen. And he talks about the four pillars of success. He talks about power, which is like health. Talks about passion and relationships. It talks about mind and purpose, I believe is the last one, but we were joking about this before you’ve got the Peloton right behind you. So you’ve got your systems for work. And we know how important a healthy body and mind are, you know, like it sounds like you have a consistent habits for all these areas of life.

Marc Anidjar

Yeah, look, I’ve my office staff actually prefers when I work out, because they say that I’m a lot more chill the rest of the day. I think whenever you’re dealing with a lot of stress, a lot of issues, a lot of things that your response before human nature is that we get more tense, more anxious, and that stress of having to deal with multiple things at the same time, it can wear on you and all of a sudden your interactions with others become a lot more. So by waking up in the morning and doing that workout, knocking it out, sweating it out, getting the stress and anxiety off your body. I think aside from taking care of your health, it also takes care of the mind in that way. Where now all of a sudden, you’re just a little bit more chill when you’re dealing with your staff, you’re a little bit more relaxed and it helps with those interactions for sure.

Chris Dreyer

An organization requires clear communication to run smoothly, but there can’t be a one size fits all policy. I asked Marc to elaborate on how he approaches communication with staff members and the impact it has on company workflow.

Marc Anidjar

As they become staff, like initially you want to be fair with everyone open door policy. If they have a question, I want them to have access. I want to be able to answer that question, but I think as they’ve been with you longer and they know what they need to do, and they already know the Anna and Levine way, you have to have a certain level of trust in that individual. I may be a little bit more lenient in terms of, where are they, what’s going on. I know they’re doing their job. I know they’re handling their work. Their clients are happy. They’re completing their tasks on time. They’re going to get a little bit more free reign. Now, if it’s someone who’s new. Now, like I said, it’s back to the original comment that we started to cut podcast, but it was just making sure we maintain the consistency of care that we’re providing our clients. Well, if I have a new employee, until I know that they’ve graduated and they’re doing things the way I want them done. Yeah. I’m going to be a little bit more. Strict with them. I’m going to be a little bit more regimented with how they perform their job. And we have what’s called like a memo sheet. Then a memo sheet is just like a cheat sheet of all the things that I want to see on a case. Date of accident, property damage insurance, where is their treatment, MRIs, all the things that I need to make a proper assessment of the case. And you’re not allowed to walk into my office if you don’t have this sheet on top of your file. But then as they graduate and as they already know the file, maybe someone who’s been here for three, four years consistently demonstrated that they know what they’re doing in that situation.
They’ll come and just have a conversation with me. They’re not going to go through the ritualistic, thing of performing this sheet before they walk in my office.

Chris Dreyer

Sounds like a lot of the characteristics of that checklist manifesto or before you take, before you’re flying a plane, you do the run-up and go through all of these steps and that’s super smart. That makes sense. Because then you can just empower those individuals that know what they’re doing and you don’t have. To stress about the, well, to some degree, I hear micromanagement as like a negative, but I think in the beginning, I absolutely agree with you. Like making sure they do it your way.

Marc Anidjar

I think it takes the stress off of them because now they already know what you’re looking for. So I think if you’re always clear in what your requests are, if you always know are concise in terms of, Hey, this is what I’m looking for. And now there’s no surprise when they walk into the room to ask you a question of what your expectations are. I think that can be. Some brevity in terms of making it more easy for them to get into the fold and figure things out.

Chris Dreyer

Jumping over to the marketing, you’re one of the firms that just truly market themselves in a fantastic manner for multiple channels that omni-channel approach. And we had Gary Sarner on previously and we were talking about radio and you’ve guys have had awesome success with radio, you know, in that medium, not saying to give away your secret sauce, but why has that been a medium that you’ve really focused and done well with?

Marc Anidjar

So I always tell everyone, I don’t mind sharing the secret sauce because there’s another discipline that comes with that. And that’s making sure you’re answering the phone, because if you’re spending all this money on advertising and your intake team, isn’t picking up the phone, making sure they’re screening them properly and making sure you’re getting proper conversions. You’re burning your money. You hit it on the head initially where you said it’s all about relationships. And I think one of the things that we did very differently in the beginning was we didn’t do, we didn’t work with ad agencies. I would meet all the general managers and the sales managers and the dos is myself. And then we would go out and have drinks together and have dinner together. And to me, I think once there’s a friendly relationship, it’s very hard for that person to not want to do the best for you. So regardless of what the contract says and what you have on paper, you know, those are the terms that you’re paying for. Those are the terms that you’re agreeing to, but there’s always added value that can be done by, you know, any of these advertisers. And I think the more, there’s an intimate relationship with the advertiser and the more, it feels like a partnership and not just like a customer, they’re more inclined to try to help you or make sure that you do right. And that happened more so in COVID than any other time in my life, because we have a very expensive advertising campaign and COVID came and every single one of our partners stepped up to the plate, helped us get through that time, maintained a lot of our assets. And now we came out of it even stronger and that wouldn’t have happened if you were just hands-off in terms of your interactions with these people. Look it’s worked very well. I think when you look at advertising, I try to say to me, keep it simple. It’s like a seven layer cake, right? There’s no, you can’t have a seven layer cake unless you have all seven layers. So initially you start off with radio, you start off with maybe things that are more cost-effective. Maybe some internet Google is type advertising. Maybe then you move on to TV as you graduate, then maybe you try additional markets. Maybe at that point, if you really feel comfortable, you can do some corporate sponsorships of some like venues and that’s more of a branding component. So you don’t want to be hopping around with your budgets going from this channel to this channel and going here for three months and here for three months, you want to have some type of consistency with either the viewers are listening. On that specific station or that specific medium where every year, year in, year out, you become a fabric of that station fabric of that radio station or a fabric of that corporate sponsorship. So the longer you’re there, the more that investment is going to yield a better result.

Chris Dreyer

Building relationships is the key to company growth. I wanted to find out just how Marc leverages these relationships from expanding into other markets.

Marc Anidjar

As you grow, those are the relationships that are going to assist you to going into other markets because those other markets are usually owned by the same company to whether it be Cox, iHeart, Odyssey, whatever, or. Fox or, you know, Hubbard. These are all major clusters that have multiple stations throughout the state. So the more you have solid relationships, as you decide to expand your practice and move into these other markets, those are going to be the guys that grease your wheels and make it so much easier for you to do so look, the relationships are important. You talked about the holy Trinity that I like to call it. Radio. Television. And Google. I think if you don’t have those three things working in concert, your ad campaign is not going to be as effective as it could be. The most expensive over those three is basically the television. So I always start off with the radio, maybe interact, interlace some of that Google advertising immediately. And then you add the TV and then the Google advertising is the portion that really doesn’t have a cap you could spend in perpetuity on that. It’s just a matter of what’s your attrition rate and what. Well, it gets to that point where it becomes a little bit too painful or you’re not able to sustain it for the long-term.

Chris Dreyer

And the other thing that you mentioned too, when you have these relationships, and I like to think of COVID as like a big opportunity. Obviously it was very detrimental to many people, but those individuals that didn’t throttle back. I mean what other time in the last 10 years, did your competitors just decide to throttle back or stop? And if you kept your foot on the pedal, that’s where you gain a lot of market share and it creates that gap. It’s harder to compete against, particularly in search engine optimization, like content marketing.

Marc Anidjar

Yeah. Look so much like that story where I told you about my dad and the profit and loss. One of the key things that we do at Anidjar & Levine is I don’t have any debt. All my advertising is bought cash up front. So when COVID hit, we were in a very good financial position to weather that storm. So aside for the fact that our partners came to the table and helped us, that what you said is very true. A lot of our other competitors were cutting, slashing their budgets, cutting out releasing assets that we thought would never become available. And because we were in a better position, we were able to pick up a lot of those things. So there was a double-edged sword there because you’re investing while your income is going down. And now you have to carry that load longer. For you to come at a COVID and reap the reward of that investment. But that’s the difference between sometimes a short-term strategy and a longterm strategy. You got to always plan for the long game, be respectful of the short game, right? What are your short-term capital needs? And then how much are you always putting aside toward long-term growth? So we always have a savings account and every time we get an unexpected windfall of a large settlement or something that was out of the norm that took place. There’s always a certain percentage that gets earmarked and allocated to our savings account because that puts us in a position for when an opportunity comes, we’re ready to roll.

Chris Dreyer

I really liked the idea that savings account. And one idea just had on the side is when you get those big windfalls and a lot of times, people don’t want to set on cash, but, and they’ll try to invest in a stocks or whatever accounts, but if you invest in your marketing, a lot of times you’ll get a better return in your marketing upfront. You might get a 10, 20% discount just doing that all entirely up front versus trying to get that same return on the stock market.

Marc Anidjar

So if you’re a doctor or if you’re someone who’s more on a fixed income, you know, you need to basically put your money to work for you so you invest in the stock market because you’re hoping to do. Better returns than you would get in a conventional bank account. I think as a personal injury attorney, we’re a rare breed in the sense that our own industry is our stock market. So the more money I put in advertising, the more my X could be five X, six X, seven X on my investment. And in that sphere, I’m in complete control. I’m not relying on shareholders. I’m not relying on an earnings report. I’m not relying on anybody to make decisions for me, we’re in complete control of our own investments. So it’s ironic that when it comes to my personal investments, which are all life and your whole life insurance, you know, real estate holdings, just very conservative stuff because I can’t be gambling on both sides of my life. I need something that’s the base. Something that’s the conservative way. Something that lets me sleep at night and feel comfortable. And that fact that I feel financially stable when money comes into the business I’m twice as aggressive as I would have otherwise been because I don’t have the obligation of financial payments or where monthly’s, that are choking me, so to speak.

Chris Dreyer

And I guess you can objectively look at those decisions a little bit differently than having to like, like force to. Look at it on a smaller basis.

Marc Anidjar

Everything’s done because of a want, not because of a need. So I don’t need to do anything. I can do it because I choose to do it super smart

Chris Dreyer

And on the growth side. So your firm’s expanded, you’ve got multiple offices and let’s talk about that aspect because that’s one that a lot of our listeners, maybe they’re doing pretty well in their market and they’re doing well in their home base. What’s the strategies to then… you know, is it to just pick another city? Expand outwardly near your location? What goes into some of those strategies and for expansion?

Marc Anidjar

So there was a market saturation point where you’re spending so much money in one area. That there’s only so much low lying fruit that you can pick. So if you try to get a hundred percent of the fruit off the tree, you got to get a ladder up there to pick off the top versus taking what’s at arms length on the bottom and getting the 70% that you can easily obtain without the additional fight. It also, it depends on the type of cases that you’re going after, which is also important, but I would just basically say you gotta have a strong market penetration where you feel year over year. Is this market continuing to grow. If the market’s continuing to grow exponentially and you’re happy with that growth, keep doing what you’re doing when you start to see that flat line or that trail off of, Hey, I’m spending XYZ more, but I’m not getting that exponential return that I was getting before. That might be the time when you say, okay, I think we hit saturation point. We need to consider maybe either expanding into another market. Or trying a different area of law, which we’ve done it in our firm as well. So we branched off into workman’s comp. We branched off into, something in Florida, that’s called PIP litigation. We do first party property claims, which has to do with hurricane claims and all those other areas. So I looked at those similar for my father who had all these different stores that were all these different profit generators. I’m like every single area of law could be another profit generator. For me, we’re calm, could be at standalone, property could be standalone, PIP could be a standalone. And then you have the main firm, which is Anadjar & Levine. And then within Anadjar & Levine itself, by going into other markets and expanding, that’s a two to three year investment. We learned a lesson when we went to Jacksonville. I thought I had the secret on how to make it work. And I went in there really hot and heavy. I went through community events and giveaways and TV and radio, and we learned our lesson quickly. In three, four months, we burned through a lot of cash. And then I’m like, all right, well, we need to do this a little differently because we have to be in here for the long game. And that’s when we dialed some stuff back and made some changes. And then all of a sudden you saw that market change. And I would also say having market information was important. We were also struggling in Jacksonville, which was our first opportunity to go to another city. And we were pushing our brand at 800 number, 807 4 7 3 7 3 3. And it wasn’t working. And when we got up there, we realized Jacksonville was more like south Georgia, small town, than it was like south Florida. And they all wanted a local attorney. So we made the change to a local 9 0 4 number. And then once we made that change, you saw a dramatic increase. And it was funny because two years later after making that change, one of the stations did a focus group for us and we appeared more local than guys that were there for multiple years. So just by making small changes of making it appear local, even taking our commercials and putting imagery of the city behind the commercials, we had them all. We cut new commercials across the state, and each state had imagery for Tampa behind it, Orlando behind it, or, you know, a bridge from Jacksonville behind it. And that brand association that local. Helped us in terms of penetrating into those markets.

Chris Dreyer

That’s super smart. It makes me think of that know like trust. So instantly you’re just hitting the trust. Oh, they’re there. They’re just like me. I live here.

Marc Anidjar

And you want to go the route of, you know, a lot of commercials are always about like, big bags of cash and stuff like that. And maybe that appeals to some segments, but I think long-term that most likely will turn most people off. I think it’s gotta be about a public service announcement. Did you know this, or are you aware this is what we can do to assist you? This is how we can get you out of your problems. You know, our main tagline is take back control. Take back control of your life. You’ve been turned upside down. This accident has changed you. You’re not able to get to work. You’re in pain. We want to help you take back control and get back to being who you were before this accident. So I think that empowerment message is also very strong. I think it resonates better. So thinking about your messaging is also very important. There’s a lot of different facets of an ad campaign that makes it effective. You want to control your messaging. You want to make sure you stay positive, sometimes you have to appear local. And then second of all, you have to do good and make it make the community. The community outreach is the last piece of the puzzle that helps close that down. Yeah.

Chris Dreyer

And on the messaging first. So I read a story when I was doing my research that you had a situation where like you tried to use human. Early on in radio advertising and maybe it wasn’t the best. And then you had, you learn these different strategies that work for your firm. For me, from an outside consumer, I see, the legal Eagle guy busting through and you got the bald Eagle sound or that guy, Jamie, I can’t remember something that was the Superbowl commercial where you had the big sledgehammer.

Marc Anidjar

There’s a saying that no publicity is bad publicity. So sometimes as long as they’re talking about you, that’s just as important. And I’m not saying sometimes putting a little humor into something that isn’t a good catch to get people to remember your name, but in that instance that you were describing, we were on this Spanish radio station and there’s like a Spanish show called el Gordo y la Flacalike, the fat guy and the skinny girl. That’s like the name of the show and it’s on Univision and it’s a very popular show in the Spanish market in Miami. So I made this caricature because back then I used to weigh a little bit more. And it was like a chubby caricature and like, yeah, I’m going to go to the call. If you have an accident problem, and, you know, I thought it was cheeky. I thought it was funny. I thought it would work. But then, people who are sitting there with their family laid up in the hospital with a broken leg, or God forbid a broken back, don’t really want to call the fat that they want to call a serious lawyer. So I think that was a lesson that I learned early on, and I think I was 25 or 26 years old when we tried that. But look there’s definitely going to be trial and error. And just what I told you, like my, like when my father and there, there was never people that only did well in business. There’s always hard times whether it’s going to be COVID coming in and kicking you and making you readjust everything, or whether employees of yours leave and try to do damage to your firm on the way out. You know, there’s always going to be some type of resilience. That you’re going to run into and how you take, how you learn from that, what you take away from that. And the changes that you make in order to get better are just as important. I think even in a ma in an advertising campaign, you’re going to make mistakes along the way. But sometimes I’d rather make eight decisions and two mistakes then make no decisions at all.

Chris Dreyer

Just continuing to move the ball forward. That reminds me of that wantrepreneur versus entrepreneur. Wantrepreneurs have a ton of ideas, but the entrepreneur just goes and executes and that continuous improvement. Marc this has been fantastic. One final question- where can people go to learn more about you and your firm?

Marc Anidjar

Our website is a key place to go anidjar&levine.com. I know Anidjar is not the easiest spelling in the world, so hopefully you’ll put it up there and there’ll be able to see it. But it’s calling our office. One of the things that we pride in our firm is that every single new call is answered by an attorney. We don’t use an intake team. I don’t use a call center. Every single one of our attorneys has a yellow pad on their desk. And it has to be screened by a lawyer and signed off by an attorney. And then that way we know that every legal issue is being seen. We had a situation where another law firm withdrew on a case because they just saw that it was a small insurance policy, but they didn’t recognize the guy was taken to the hospital, the hospital committed malpractice, and we wound up setting that case for seven figures. So if it wasn’t for an attorney screening that call and really looking at all the legal issues, rather than just the one in front of their face, we, someone would have missed that and actually on another law firm dude. So I think those are the things that we always bring to the table, coming to our website, calling us whenever you have a problem. And you know, we’re always here to answer questions, whatever they are.

Chris Dreyer

I’d like to thank Marc Anidjar from Anidjar & Levine for sharing a story with us. And I hope you gained some valuable insights from the conversation. You’ve been listening to personal injury mastermind. I’m Chris Dreyer. If you liked this episode, leave us a review. We’d love to hear from our listeners. I’ll catch you on next week’s PIMM with another incredible guest and all the strategies you need to take your personal injury practice to the next level.

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