127. Logan Quirk, Quirk Accident & Injury Attorneys — What’s in a Name? Rebranding, Increased Exposure, and Brand Clarity

subscribe NOW

The founder of Quirk Accident & Injury Attorneys, Logan Quirk has opened offices across two states with plans to expand into a third. He’s an expert at executing vision and pivoting when necessary – he initiated a rebrand amid the uncertainty of COVID – and has seen massive success as a result. Happy clients remain his firm’s focus – no matter how large it grows.

Today, we cover business development on any budget and how to leverage the resources you do have for maximum return. We also dive into seeing challenges as opportunities to refocus your vision and come out on top.

What’s in This Episode

  • Who is Logan Quirk?
  • Why is a firm name so important?
  • What is Logan’s take on replicating explosive growth?
  • In an evolving marketing landscape, how does Logan recommend leveraging traditional and digital marketing?
  • How can attorneys build ‘boots on the ground’ networks?
  • What will fuel growth during difficult times like pandemics and economic recessions?
  • How can a firm successfully execute a rebrand?

Transcript

Logan Quirk

It was like, okay, I’m scared now, what am I going to do lean into it instead of run away from it and see what you can do to work with it. And I think when there’s an obstacle, rather than go around it, find out a way go through it.

Chris Dreyer

Growth and unexpected challenges can be scary. But having the courage to find the acceptance of discomfort and look for opportunities will help you beat the competition.

Logan Quirk

I think as long as you can be adaptable and look at your business with open and honest eyes and There’s always going to have dividends that are paid in the back end.

Chris Dreyer

The founder of Quirk Accident Injury Attorneys, Logan Quirk has opened four offices across two states and plans to expand into a third. Growth like his requires the ability to execute a vision and pivot when necessary. He initiated a rebrand amid the uncertainty of COVID and has been rewarded with the team who shares his goals. Today, we cover business development on any budget to leverage the resources you do have for maximum return. We also dive into seeing challenges as opportunities to refocus your vision and come out on top. I’m your host, Chris Dreyer, founder, and CEO of Rankings.io. We help elite personal injury attorneys dominate first page rankings with search engine optimization. In high school Logan knew that he wanted to be a lawyer. Fresh out of law school. He spent four years working with his mentor and brother who remains the best lawyer Logan knows today. He explains the impact of the relationship and why he made the decision to begin his own firm.

Logan Quirk

I think we have a healthy competition. We both know our strengths and weaknesses. We’re very secure with ourselves. We do practice in the same geographic area he’s licensed in California in Nevada. So my also in Montana the one thing that made me want to go and branch out was I wanted to move cities. So in order for me to expand, I was in my mid twenties. And mid to late twenties, I was making that decision. I’ve moved down to San Diego and started my firm. My brother’s firm was firmly entrenched in Ventura. And even though we do practice the same area of law, we have carved out a nice little area where we get clients from different places. And there really isn’t much competition anymore. If anything, it’s a collaboration. And it’s nice to have a sounding board to run cases by, and talk to someone who’s been through it and talk about what’s working, what’s not working and share some stories and also to have someone to vent to, because what we do can be challenging. But at the end of the day, we’re brothers and we have love for each other. And there’s no one else I would rather learn from.

Chris Dreyer

I think it’s amazing to have your brother as a mentor and both get to have those conversations about, just the day in, day out. Those in the weeds conversation can really be effective and almost be therapeutical.

Logan Quirk

Yeah. I was just thinking that it’s like being a counselor for each other. Just having that opportunity to share what you were going through or have that, oh, I have F- this, F-that I didn’t have a day. And to have someone who has that similar experience and kind of relate and empathize.

Chris Dreyer

You decided to start your own firm. So what went into the vision? How are you thinking about bizdev? Yeah that’s one of the key ones, right? We can be excellent lawyers you’ve got to get the leads. So what went into that process?

Logan Quirk

I came up with a plan and I think once you get on your own, that plan goes out the window. Cause you’re just trying to scratch to survive. When you have your firm and you’re first starting out and you see that bank account down in the zeros or in the red, you start trying everything. And to this day, I’m still tinkering to see what works and what doesn’t work. It’s always good I think to be innovative and not be so stuck in your ways and see what works and what doesn’t and innovate and kind of pivot when you have to, I think if anything, the pandemic forced us all to take that up. I think once you start your own business, those plans, you try and stick to them, but you got to pivot on the spot and be able to adapt to and evolve.

Chris Dreyer

I think that’s a key component, right? When you have the the ability to be adaptable and take things in stride. And, let’s talk about, some of those BizDev principles though, that you really apply because you’ve had really explosive growth, right? You’re up to your third or fourth location. Personal Injury attorneys are listening are like, Hey, we’re always looking for, business development assistance. What’s your thought on biz dev in terms of generating clients for a lawyer?

Logan Quirk

This is the best piece of advice I can give. I think we all know we need multiple streams of revenue. and kind of see what works and what doesn’t work. I still hold true to the maximum that you got to have multiple sources. I think digitals must be in digital. You got to have Google, you have to have some type of social media. And just having a team in your corner that you don’t have the time or the expertise to have that person delegate out and be comfortable with that person and not be scared to tinker with it, ask questions and push back because just like law -the world digital marketing is changing and obviously, cause you’re an expert in it. And I think there’s also some other streams of revenue that people have forgotten. They’re still boots to the ground business to business. That’s always, word of mouth reliable, good, consistent stream of revenue. So if you put all your eggs in one basket, You might rock it up or you might flame out at one point, I think COVID taught us that so many people that rely on one or two sources of revenue may not be there in a longterm. So as much as I can, I, I like to diversify. listen to my money manager and diversify your portfolio. I try and employ that strategy when I do marketing.

Chris Dreyer

I think that’s super smart in terms of a marketing strategy, individuals, they change where they congregate. You may have a lot of individuals hanging out on Facebook, then they shift over to Instagram and then the eyeballs are over on YouTube. And we’ve seen what’s happened with. Yeah. At one point, the yellow pages, everyone was checking the phone book and the TV guide, and now it’s just, you constantly have to adapt. And I think for me, probably many individuals listening are like, oh, he’s just the SEO guy. And yeah, I am, that’s my expertise, but there’s nothing that makes me happier than when we take on a client that does the branding initiatives. If you want to build mass awareness, the most amount of oppressions that you can acquire is TV and radio. I know it, it gets more difficult to target individuals, I think the proof is in the pudding. I hate that saying, but look at some of the biggest firms there are and how they grew their audience. Many of them were TV. Now it’s starting to shift certainly more digital, what’s your thoughts on that in terms of traditional versus digital?

Logan Quirk

I remember when I first started out the competition was to be on the first page of the phone book with the, that ad or the back of the phone book or the spine and how that has changed. being in LA and hearing a few of the different attorneys marketing. I can pull up their jingle out of my head. If I turn on like sports radio or even in this building, I’m sitting in, oftentimes I’d come into work. And one of the guys that advertises in LA is over my building and I’m like, what the, what the F but, congrats to them. That’s how they chose to grow their market. And they have the capital to do that. it all comes down to, I think, what you’re comfortable doing and what kind of firm you want to be. If you want to be a big firm like that, then you obviously have to have that brand awareness. You want to be a boutique firm. It’s not going to be necessary for you to be on billboards, TVs, radio you just want to build your from to the extent that you’re you’re comfortable and what you really, where your vision is for your firm. Some lawyers don’t want to be a volume firms, some want to be trial attorneys, some want to be, somewhere in between. So I think as long as you know what you are and what you’re comfortable doing, you can fit your marketing into accomplish that task.

Chris Dreyer

I think it’s a great piece of advice that isn’t talked about enough. And you see these two distinctions, I know there’s hybrids and different variations. You got to, your settlement firms versus your trial attorneys. I think that if you’re an excellent trial attorney, then you can get maximum value and maybe not take as many cases as the high volume settlement shop have a super high margins and profitability. I think the marketing even changes, maybe elevating your social proof from a referral strategy, as opposed to going direct to consumer. I want to circle back though to the boots on the ground. So we had Dave Thomas on from law tigers and one of the things that they do is, they have a sprinter van that they, wrap in their Law Tigers and have all the swag and they go to all the motorcycle events. I’ve just thought that was super smart. When you think of boots on the ground, what are you thinking of tactically in terms of building that network?

Logan Quirk

Yeah, I think that’s really smart. I know the Law Tigers brand and they’ve branded themselves really well. They’re in that niche and that’s really really awesome. That they’ve been able to develop that niche and generate that type of market. For me, when I was a new business owner, I had zero money. But what I had was time, so what I was doing was putting in my I’ll say boots. I was wearing Nike’s at the time. Cause I still bristle aware enough to wear a suit every day. First interview I put on a button down. Otherwise I’d be looking more like you in a t-shirt with Nike on it. Just go on and shaking hands, meeting people and putting your face in front of as many people as you can. And that as long as I had the time to put in the work then I try to make it happen. Going to swap meets, going to, farmer’s markets, just meeting people or having a booth and just getting your exposure out there and just talking to people. I got a lot of nos. So luckily I’m really almost annoyingly persistent. And I think a lot of people were just like, I’m sick of this guy here. Here’s a case just go away. And at some point, okay, give me one and then maybe one will turn into two. Cause we’ll see what you can do. But as long as you get one, hopefully it turns into. So boots on the ground is just working what you had. And at that time I had nothing but time And that’s what I did. And I chose to go try to meet as many doctors as I could chiropractors people who I thought could send me cases. the success rate wasn’t high, but, for one or two, that sent me a case. It does thank you very much. Cause that helped propel me to the point of where I’m a bit more comfortable on it. I don’t ever want to say I’m 100% comfortable with where I’m at, because I’m always tinkering and looking to change a few things, but it definitely helped out.

Chris Dreyer

No matter the size of the firm, stay hungry. Keep growing. Consider the impact of economic factors like recession and inflation on your bottom line. If you’re not growing, you’re going backwards, Don’t be afraid to pivot or follow new revenue streams. This was Logan’s experience when he took on his first negligent security premises liabilities case.

Logan Quirk

When I was on in San Diego, I got an opportunity to represent one of my favorite clients ever. And he was visiting his auntie in San Diego and there was a drive-by. He was talking to one of the people that lived at that apartment complex. And we premise liability. Case with negligent security this area was known for activity. It was very active with gangs and whatnot, and the apartment complex new people would come on and commit crimes, but they failed to provide sufficient security measures, such as gates, security guard, all things that were pretty. Reasonable in comparison to the harm that was caused. So those are some of the cases from that case that I will take on. but just because of that one case it’s propelled me or given me a little bit of confidence to take on those cases. So long as the facts are present they are tough cases, those are some of the cases that restore your faith in people and make you hungry and want to help out people because those. No people are really in the wrong place at the wrong time and it could have been prevented. Those are the type of cases that I think help us keep doing what we’re doing. And sometimes not always get dismayed or down because we’re not always doing the same cookie cutter variety case. I think it’s good to have some variety or at least have some cases where a clients that still gets you firing on in it. Once you lose that fire, there, no point to doing what youre doing anymore.

Chris Dreyer

I couldn’t agree more. And I want to dig into this a little bit further because I’ve been on the marketing side of premises liability, slip, and fall trip and fall. And you’re looking for building code violations and all these different types of things. Looking at these types of cases, how do you identify oh, there is a case there.

Logan Quirk

It’s very similar to any type of premise liability case. The evidence is not readily obtainable. I’ll often just go and drive to the site and see what I see. And if I walk around the apartment and I see oh my gosh, this is terrible. Or you send an investigator out there. But I like to put my own eyes on it that way I know what I’m getting involved with. It’s I would say it’s pretty close to a premise liability cases. Cause you don’t have all the evidence at hand and oftentimes you’ve got to Sue or send a subpoena to get it. And then once the evidence comes your way, then you have more more facts available to you to make a decision on whether or not it’s a very good case. Not so good case or a case that just doesn’t have any legs. So it is more of a. Risk, but sometimes those people are worth the risk and sometimes those risks or pay dividends just because you can get that smile on the client’s face and get them the compensation they deserve. Like any case, it might require more work. And that might be why some attorneys are reticent to take them on. We don’t shy away from cases like that. We would like to actually go and do our research and be diligent about the process and make sure that we’re doing what we can to get necessarily recovery for our clients.

Chris Dreyer

You’ve really launched and grown your practice during an economic downturn, when things are great, it’s much easier to grow and you’re growing in these difficult times, and you’ve done really well. So when you’re looking at things like COVID or recession what’s your mentality. Going into this and still wanting to grow your practice and run a great firm?

Logan Quirk

Yeah, I think COVID presented a unique opportunity for a lot of us. I think like everyone else, my numbers were down drastically, maybe a few settlements skewed people’s resorts and bottom line, but I think for the most part, most attorneys client intake was down and bottom line revenue was probably down to, I don’t know, call the percentages off hand, but so I, I also had a little bit more time because I have less cases coming in and we could work the cases we had, which we did, but I was scared because the clients weren’t coming in, like they were pre COVID and we weren’t quite sure how long the pandemic was going to happen in California. I think we took some of the most drastic measures, so we were definitely some of the most effective attorneys. So I took the opportunity to I’ll say, tear down my business, but I took it down to the bones and rebranded. Got some more people in place that were more in line with my vision and started getting me results. I think I leaned into it after a while after the fear, it was like, okay, I’m scared now, what am I going to do lean into it instead of run away from it and see what you can do to work with it. And I think when there’s an obstacle, rather than go around it, find out a way go through it. So that’s what we did. And I’m still working on that. It’s never a done process. I think that’s probably the key to me is it’s always a process. And there’s always going to be things that are humming at the moment. And then, like you said, they may not work. It’s like audience shifts from Yellow Book to Facebook, to Google to now TickTok. You know, we are always chasing chasing the crowd, but I think as long as you can be adaptable and look at your business with open and honest eyes and say, okay this isn’t working let’s try something else, but also be mindful of what you try. You gotta, we get marketed all the time, just I’m sure you do it. If I jumped into everything that was presented to me, I’d be broke. So you have to be diligent about what you also are getting involved with and make sure that you’re getting involved with the right people. And I think that’s where lawyers. Are very smart, thankful to this podcast and people like you that when I called you, I didn’t have the budget to hire your services, but you gave me three or four people. And those three or four people gave me different referrals. So I think people that are willing to share and be transparent. And kind of share the wealth, so to speak. There’s always going to have dividends that are paid in the back end. I think that’s probably the best way to, to think about how we grew as we, we took advantage of tearing down our business and we’re open and honest about what was working, what wasn’t. And I took advantage of some of the connections I had and I took a lot of people’s time. Pick your brain, picked everyone else’s brain. And I’m thankful to those people because without their clinics thoughts I don’t think I would’ve been able to be as successful as I am currently.

Chris Dreyer

And first thank you for that. And yeah, I will say that w we talk a lot about, the omni-channel the multi-channel approach, but there’s also, you have to have focus and give it the attention it needs. Otherwise, there’s a million different marketing stragities and solicitations that can really drain the pocket book. The other thing I wanted to talk about your rebrand, with the vanity phone number the quick wins and that strategy, what went into that? The URLs change, so what’s the first of all the thought process behind it. And basically how you’re intending to really maximize that portion of marketing. There was a book I read called Fireproof that brought the EOS thoughts to law. And in looking at that book, I took some of that and took some of the things that I had been tinkering with and thinking about doing it. And I was like, you know what, now’s the time it’s it’s finally time to. Take the next step and stop being scared. So those are some ideas that come to mind and then getting rid of the things that weren’t working and finding new people to help accomplish that goal. So as far as changing the name, I wanted people to know exactly what I do. My previous name Quirk Law group, that’s great. You’re an attorney and we get that, but if you’re on Google and that you have to do one more clip to see what type of water or type of law we practice. So took away the log group and put in accident and injury attorneys. And in talking to a bunch of marketing experts like yourself, Google was starting to pick up on that needed to be in your title. And that helps set you apart from people who had made that change. I didn’t want to make the change in my name cause there’s, it’s hard to change, especially when you’re a small firm. There’s a whole lot of work you gotta do to go ahead and change your name and change your website and change your marketing approach. So I wanted to have a more simplistic approach. You look at the name, you see what you get, and it’s simple, it’s bold, but it conveys a message that we want it to convey. And I think we’re, we are doing that. Like I said, I think it’s a process. I don’t think it’s ever going to be done and things may change. Some things may not work. And I think what COVID taught me was you can’t be scared to, to tinker and make the changes because if, as long as you have. The portfolio or the streams of income, one may dry out, but while you’re taking a song, you, others will be there to support what you’re trying to do. But I will say you don’t want to be quick, too quick to change because sometimes you gotta be in the game a little bit in order to, you gotta plant a bunch of seeds in order to see them sprout. So you don’t want to pull out too quickly because you might need not reaping what you sow.

Chris Dreyer

I think it’s a great piece of advice, particularly for content marketing. It just takes a little time to compound and develop that organic. A lot of DIs from the DiSC Personality Assessment. Yeah. And Mike Morese John Nachazel, their book.

Logan Quirk

Thank you. That I was trying to think of his name. I couldn’t, he wrote a great book and it couldn’t come at a better time for me. So if i ever If I ever see him com. If you ever see him, tell him big. Thanks.

Chris Dreyer

The biggest advantage of quirkwins.com is simplicity. Easy to remember an SEO friendly. From Quirk Law Group to Quirk Accident Injury Attorneys, Logan changed his firm’s name to reflect his vision and keep up with best practices as they change over time. Lawyer’s looking to open a firm face a set of new challenges and opportunities. Here’s Logan’s advice on opening a new practice.

Logan Quirk

Nowadays it’s a little bit different than when we came out. Cause it was, you needed an office space. So I think today, and seeing some of these attorneys who are forming co-working environments or work from home. It might be a little bit easier for those people to commit to opening up. Cause it might be less capital intensive. And I think that’s really awesome. There’s a lot of support networks and third-party vendors are all coming together to give new lawyers an opportunity to have their own firm, but share the resources and succeed. And I think that’s really awesome. Obviously you gotta have some money set aside because you’re going to have to spend some money before you start making some money. Don’t be scared when that money gets near zero or below zero. And don’t be scared to fail because you have a law degree, you’re going to be able to pick yourself back up So good piece of Advice is to make sure you plan well, set up some money aside, go figure out what type of lawyer you think you want to be. And don’t be scared if that changes on the fly. And don’t be scared to fail. You got to go out on limb to get the fruit.

Chris Dreyer

I like that saying, go out on a limb to get the fruit. I like it be a, it’s a great, the execution side of things. That’s what it’s all about is again, there’s so many wantprentreprenuers, but the entrepreneurs go make it happen, and. Logan, What’s next for quirk accident and injury attorneys?

Logan Quirk

So we’re taking the show on the road, as you’ve mentioned. Also during COVID I took the opportunity to get a license in another state. we got licensed in Montana and I’m realizing a childhood dream to go spend some time, fly fishing on the river, up there on our new property and seeing what type of business we can grow up there in Montana. While we were maintaining our California in about a presence.

Chris Dreyer

I love that Logan saw the pandemic as an opportunity- despite fears of decreasing bottom line revenue. He took the time to strip his business to the bones, rebrand, and bring on people more in line with his vision to get results. Let your vision for firm size and type inform your marketing strategy. Large firms needed capital for mass exposure. Boutique firms can spend marketing budgets in more targeted areas where their clients are more likely to congregate. Whatever your from type diversity in your digital marketing streams will hedge against risk and increase profitability. Consider what mix of traditional digital and boots on the ground interactions will engage your audience. I’d like to thank Logan Quirk from Quirk Accent Injury Attorneys for sharing his story with us and I hope you gained some valuable insights from the conversation. You’ve been listening to Personal Injury Mastermind. I’m Chris Dreyer. If you liked this episode, leave us a review. We love to hear from our listeners. I’ll catch you on next week’s PIMM with another incredible guest and all the strategies you need to master personal injury marketing.

Get Our Best Personal Injury
Marketing Tips

Delivered straight to your inbox
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Comments Below

Let us know your thoughts

More Episodes