138. Kyle Newman, James Newman, PC — How to Win More Cases: Technology in the Courtroom

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Less than 5% of personal injury cases go to trial. And 90% of the cases that do go to trial end up losing. Kyle Newman has been to trial over 75 times – with a near-perfect track record. How? Establishing credibility, being authentic, and using tech to illustrate the case. Today Kyle, Senior Associate at James Newman Law, offers practical advice on how to meet your jury where they are. Drop the legalese – especially if your jury comes from predominantly working-class backgrounds with mostly high school educations. Know your case backward and forward. Sleep with the documents and keep them organized. Ditch the cardboard cutouts and get familiar with cutting-edge tech. And above all – be yourself.

What’s In This Episode

  • Who is Kyle Newman?
  • As more cases are won, is the opposition harder?
  • Why do young attorneys have an advantage over seasoned veterans in the court?
  • What is the cutting-edge tech Kyle uses to win cases?
  • How does Kyle draw inspiration for creative trial practices in daily life?
  • How can an attorney organically grow social media to over 20,000 followers?

Transcript

Kyle Newman

The defence firm was like, you don’t have a case. There’s nothing, but when we did it okay. With the 360 camera. It really proved the case.

Chris Dreyer

Technology in the courtroom is doing more than just winning cases.

Kyle Newman

When you use this trial technology, it adds an additional level of credibility to you, and it’s really super engaging for a jury

Chris Dreyer

You’re listening to personal injury mastermind, where we give you the tools you need to take your personal injury practice to the next level. Kyle Newman is a force in the medical malpractice space, recovering over $10 million for his clients. Before the age of 35, he has been admitted into both the Million Dollar and Multimillion Dollar Advocates Forum. A third generation trial attorney, the practice of James Newman is a family affair. Kyle joined his father, James and works alongside his two brothers. Kyle has a near perfect trial record, thanks to his tireless preparation boosted by cutting edge tech he uses to connect with his juries. Today. We dig into the soft skills that win cases. We talk about the latest trial technology, so you can ditch the cardboard blowups, go beyond the PowerPoint and win more cases. We also explore how social media can help with networking and referral. I’m your host, Chris Dreyer founder and CEO of Rankings.io. We help elite personal injury attorneys dominate first page rankings with surge engine optimization. Being at the forefront of marketing is all about understanding people. So let’s get to know our guest here’s Kyle Newman, senior associate at James Newman PC.

Kyle Newman

I’m a New York guy, born and raised in long island. Uh, having my grandfather and my dad in both personal injury attorneys. we used to go as little kids, the Bronx bar association, which both my dad and my grandfather were huge in, they used to take these annual trips to like Puerto Rico. And when I was there, I didn’t really know it at the time, but I was around these incredible attorneys, trial lawyers I’m mean. Big time guys that I really grew up with. at the end of the day, I was the kind of type that didn’t really know necessarily what I wanted to do in college. And then in law school, it became a little bit clear that I definitely wanted to be in court. I just loved that. So it was the natural choice.

Chris Dreyer

So you had a little bit of that immersion, right? You needed to know what was happening. Totally. So you work with your father and your little brother, so what’s that are you always on the same page or do you have that family rivalry? Like how does that

Kyle Newman

So I’m the oldest of three brothers, actually, both of my brothers work here. My middle brother is an attorney. My youngest brother is a paralegal. When I first started out, it was really just me and my dad. And then once my middle brother came in, it really worked out great because we all do different things. I’m our senior trial attorney. I do all of our trial work. running a law of practice is not just about trial work. It’s about moving cases, settling cases all this stuff in between, which my middle brother Devon is phenomenal at. my dad for the most part, runs the business he’s with the clients every day. Which I guess to a certain extent we all are, but I think with a family practice, when you have. Each of us doing different things, it helps in the family dynamic. There’s always times where we want to kill each other, but I think that’s natural. So yeah it’s worked out great so far.

Chris Dreyer

That’s awesome. That’s awesome. Love it. Yeah. Let’s take a step back. I gotta talk about this. So your first case outta law school was in the Manhattan Supreme court and you got a maximum jury verdict of a hundred thousand dollars. Take us back there. How did you prepare for that first case and what support helped lead to the success?

Kyle Newman

I had a wonderful client who was really badly hurt. It was a tough car accident case where the liability was disputed. And I just loved this guy. I think it was the first sense of. Real passion for a case, really this is how I am with people in general. And it really applies to my cases as well, where I really feel like people are part of my family when I spend so much time with them and fight for them. And, it’s like I’m going to court for, my brother or my spouse or something like that. So for that one, Started out working for my dad over the summer, after the bar I did some travel and then I started working and I literally tried that case two weeks after being admitted. So I had started working on the case, obviously didn’t know what the hell I was doing. Like anyone, starting out, sweating, nervous. Procedure forget about it. My objections were a joke, but I think at the end of the day what really came through was my passion for the case and how much work that I put into it. And just knowing the records, knowing the evidence so that when things came up, I really had a response for them, even though I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. And I’ll give you a funny story of how. Intense and how into it I was we’re doing openings and in New York county at the, in this courtroom, they like a lot of courtrooms. They wheel out the evidence car. So it’s on this wheel thing. And for whatever reason the The court attorney puts it like in the, in front of the jury. So the, if I remember it was a taxi case, like I said, it was a little messed up liability. So I’m trying to reenact the case in front of the jury. And I didn’t see this cart and I literally stumbled backwards and fell over the cart. Okay. Over that, the evidence. Exploded. Okay. All over the place I’m sweating. I’m like totally freaked out. But at the end of the day, I think the jurors really appreciated it, that they could see. I was a young guy. I didn’t really know what I was doing yet, but I believed in the case. And I believed in my client and what better feeling it, that was the first real taste of what it’s like to win a trial and be in, in court. And I loved it and I’ve. Pretty much chasing that feeling my entire career for what 14 years now.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah, it’s incredible. And I’ve had other top trial attorneys on and the one thing I hear is when they care. you can take that empathy and passion and pass it on to the jury. And it sounds like you, you got all the information you could, you really wanted to serve them. And. You may not, you didn’t have the experience, but you had the knowledge and you put in the hard work and the time to learn about the case. so only four to 5% of personal injury cases go to trial. And 90% of the cases that do go to trial end up losing. You’ve been to trial over 75 times with a near perfect track record. So I wanted to dive into what makes a lawyer credible to the jury. And how to leverage technology. what goes into that credibility point for the, in the eyes of the jury?

Kyle Newman

When it comes to credibility I think the first and the core thing is how much work you’re putting into the case. If you set a standard for yourself, which is really what I’ve done since the beginning is to, I’m gonna outwork. No one is gonna know this case, the records, the evidence know every page of the transcripts, better than me. Okay. I’m gonna live, breathe, sleep with these records. So I think that builds credibility. When you come into court, if you’re unprepared a judge asks you a question, a witness does something where you’re, thrown off, you’re flustered a jury’s gonna see that right away. And it’s gonna diminish your credibility, I think right off the bat. I think, the other thing is this also takes time for lawyers and really it definitely took me a while, but is trying to be as authentic to yourself. Possible. There’s a great book by Jerry Spence, I believe it’s Win Your Case, but he talks about just being yourself as much as he can really. Adds to your credibility. If you’re trying to put on a show or act like someone you are not. I think that definitely harms there’s this paradox of naturalness. Okay. In a courtroom that lawyers have this instinct to want to act like a lawyer and talk like a lawyer, but especially in our line of. Personal injury. I think the absolute, most successful attorneys out there can explain complex topics like a normal person would to explain it to a jury who, working in New York for the most part, my cases are in the Bronx. I’m dealing with a lot of people that, for the most part. Might have a high school education or, low income people, definitely hardworking working class people, but they’re not gonna understand lawyer talk. And when you start doing that, you alienate people. And I always think that the best lawyers just can talk and present themselves like normal people across the board. I think that’s the case.

Chris Dreyer

Think that’s a great piece of advice for that communication point of view and like the, the comprehension that goes into it. One thing I’ve always wanted to ask, and I’m gonna ask you here, this is cuz you know you watch movies, and you see these heavy hitting attorneys and then it seems like they draw in. The competition that’s heavy hitting. So over the years has winning become more difficult, are they, your name’s attached to the case? And they’re like, boom, we’re gonna bring in our top defense attorney, has that. Elevated the game and made the game even more challenging.

Kyle Newman

So being my firm sole trial attorney, first of all I have a little unique, upbringing as a trial lawyer, being, able to try as many cases as I have, because once I started my dad who already had a, a pretty busy solo practice was. You’re gonna try every single case from here on out. And that’s really what I did. And my specialty is medical malpractice work. Especially with med mal and some of the, high exposure, catastrophic injury cases, you’re always dealing for the most part with the senior partners in the firm, the real, big swinging, seasoned guys. And that’s been my. Secret weapon. It’s my David a Goliath thing, and it’s something that I talk about a lot. And I think it’s the most important thing for young attorneys to realize is that when you’re young and relatively unknown and you go up against these big, scary defense, partners or trial attorneys that have 20, 30 years experience on you, you actually have an advantage because those guys are not going to see you coming. Those guys are going to see you a young attorney and they’re going to let their guard down and think, you know what? Maybe I could do less to get over on this guy. I’ve done this a million times. I’m not gonna work quite as hard. I’ll have my associate work on it. And then what a lot of the time happens from opening statements or really right when we start talking to the jury, they’re caught off guard because of the preparation and in my case, how much experience that I have. And the other thing which I know we’ll talk about later is the use of trial technology in court, which I’ve been really big on for about 10 years. I stumbled on this stuff. But that has that alone is such an important piece of the puzzle, because. There’s a huge divide. I see these days with the attorneys that are trying cases from the defense bar who are for the most part, much older, they don’t let their young associates really try cases nearly as much as plaintiff’s firms. And for anyone young out there, if you’re working at a firm, do anything that you can to get in front of a jury, get in front of a judge, whether it’s a mediation, at a de. Do any beg, just to get out there because it’ll go a long way. But with the trial tech stuff, a lot of these guys are just old school. They’re doing it the same way. That really my dad’s age guys, guys in their sixties and, even in their fifties are stuck in the, the cardboard blow up. Ways things that I’m sure that have worked in the past. But when you use this trial technology, it adds an additional level of credibility to you, and it’s really super engaging for a jury. For myself picture. When someone comes in with just paper exhibits, or let’s say they just have stacks of papers that they’re passing out to the jury. And I have a 90 inch, projector screen, and a crystal clear projector. Sometimes what I’ll do is if I have a white wall in a courtroom, I’ll blow up the projector screen for the it’s like a drive-in movie. So when I’m presenting evidence and I’m able to go through and pull up stuff laser quick, it just adds an additional level of credibility. And it leaves an impression on these people that no matter how good your, the, your adversary is, if they’re not using that, that alone is going to give you an edge. And it’s something that I love talking about because I still don’t see a lot of people using it for whatever reason.

Chris Dreyer

We can see examples of this. Most recently in the public case of Johnny de Amber heard the defense pushed around papers and struggled to find what they needed. Confidence comes from preparation. Col sees trial tech as an essential part of preparation. He takes us through the tools he uses

Kyle Newman

What I use in really any presentation that I do, it could be a trial. It could be at a deposition. What I use is a dedicated laptop,So it’s really. For my trial stuff. And I use a software it’s called Exhibit View, which I came across about 10 years ago. which is basically enables you to pull up any piece of evidence in your entire file. basically two clicks and it’s up, you can also do a ton of stuff with it. You can compare and contrast different pieces of evidence you can highlight, you can circle. There’s a lot of different things that you can do really on the fly. It’s very intuitive. that ability to have your entire caseload there and not have to spend any money on anything. one of the big reasons why I got into this was because I was having so much trouble. One with hiring trial technicians, because it was very expensive for my small practice. I would use these big cardboard blowups, and then I, they would get damaged or dirty or, shit it up one time I had a trial, I was lugging in about 20 different blowups that I had spent. I don’t know, two grand on from staples. And I got caught in the rain. Ruined all of them. Okay. And I was cursing this. I was like, and then I had to, go nuts and drive to staples and freak out and reprint it. And it was a whole thing. And I’m, I was spending so much money and time using this stuff where with trial technology, you don’t have to spend a dime on any, anything to blow up every piece of evidence that you have, photos, videos, all of your documents, it’s up like that. These days, younger attorneys are already tech savvy, you use computers for the most part, we use cloud systems for, for case management whether it’s Dropbox and everything is really digital.So you have everything already scanned in. You have all of your evidence. It’s just a matter of finding a way to use it and this software is it’s incredible. The only catch with it is it’s only for PCs. So the other thing that I found is that you can use this software virtually as well. All you need is an extended screen. So basically the software projects, whatever you want to put up, there’s a. Projector button so you set it up, project it, then you can interact with it. But for the most part, people have an extended monitor or just a second monitor. I These days you could go on Amazon and get ’em for, 50 bucks. But. You can set that up for mediations as well, so that you can rebut, different, points that your adversary’s making, you can present your whole case. I think that there’s a lot of value in some instances with using things like PowerPoint, which I know a lot of attorneys talk about, but the big problem with that is that you have to follow along in sync. Okay. And if something comes up that’s, you don’t have you’re prepared or that’s not in the order that you set it up, you’re totally screwed. And I think, when I first started out, I tried doing that too. And it was just a mess with this. If anything comes up, you have a 1500 page medical record, you can just pull up any page, you know what doctor’s talking about and boom, is that what happened? Was that your history, what was your exam on this day? It really gives them nowhere to hide and I think what people, need to at least try it out to see that it actually simplifies the process of putting on a case cross examining a witness because you have everything so easily and organized right there. All you need is really a good outline and and you’re good to go instead of having a million, Stacks of paper and shuffling through. It’s a, it could be a disaster, especially for guys that are doing it on their own which is something that, that I take a lot of pride in that I’ve always done my trials and work up all on my own.

Chris Dreyer

One of the things that comes to mind, and I think we, for many individuals, like no one wants to go on jury duty. So these individuals don’t wanna be there. They’re not getting paid well. And so the time perspective is you’re trying to win the trust. And the likability perspective for the jury. And it just seems if you’re moving through and you’re organized and totally doesn’t seem like you’re wasting their time, that they’ll like you more.

Kyle Newman

It cuts out all the BS, it gets right to the point and uh, So the way that I got into this is I told you I was trying cases for maybe three years. I had some good results. But I wasn’t getting like over the top verdicts on case some cases that really I think that my clients deserved a little bit more. And I felt that I put on a great case, but it just wasn’t getting there. And when I talked to jurors, they were telling me that, your presentation really wasn’t, As good as, the way that you, we could see that you felt about the case and wanted to show us. And it was just kinda lacking. So I went to a CLE with the New York state trial lawyers, and I’ll never forget this. There was a amazing attorneys. His name is Martin Edelman. He’s still practices in New York, he is one of the top New York city trial lawyers. And he was talking about demonstrative evidence, and it was like, he was looking right at me. He asked a question. He was like, what does, what do all jurors love? What do all jurors love? And everyone around the room, they say, oh, they love their family. They love chocolate. They love, vacation. He’s no, all jurors love television. Okay. Everyone loves TV and we all do. Everyone loves TV because it’s engaging. It’s stimulating. for the most part, people are watching and listening and want. Immediate, gratification and engagement. Okay. And that was what clicked with me. And that’s when I ventured off to try different software. There’s other things like . Trial Director or Trialed, which you use on a an iPad. There was there’s some others like I don’t know if that one’s around anymore, but it just so happened that Exhibit View. Easiest to use for, a solo guy where I didn’t really need help. It’s very intuitive. It’s so easy to learn. You could learn it in 30 minutes. So I think that is the engagement element. You gotta engage these jurors, they expect it.

Chris Dreyer

So what I’ve wondered is like you hit on the mediums, right? You got the visual, you have the television component. You can see. The different angles, things like that. Do you compliment it?

Kyle Newman

I just had a trial where it was a improperly installed shower door And it was one of these really thick glass doors that was improperly installed and shattered on this young, she was 21 years old, closed the door, it shattered all over. It looked like a murder scene that she had lacerations all over. But what I did was I went online and I bought a one foot piece of glass to just pass around to the jury and so that they could feel how heavy that thing was. And if you could imagine an entire wall of that, shattering, all over you, that kind of makes it tangible too. Another thing that I’ll do is one case that stands out it was one of my big biggest verdicts right before COVID it was an extended hospital stay where a surgeon my client developed a really significant infection and this surgeon did not, he was admitted to the hospital for six weeks. Okay. This surgeon did not see him for five of those weeks. Okay. Despite all these other people and he was in the hospital the entire time. Okay. So what I did was I blew up basically two. Calendars that I could write on. Okay. So I went week by week. You were here on the this whole week, right? Let’s X out all these days that you didn’t see ’em, let’s go the next week because P you tell someone 30 days, or, a month, it might not register it. When you show them on calendar, how many days? That is how many weekends, where my client was in the hospital, in the worst pain and all this horrific stuff going on, you didn’t walk down the hole and see him that. Something like that puts it over the top two. So I think it’s, I think you should always be, looking for additional ways to make your points. these days you can get amazing 3D renderings of CT imaging and MRIs. I. Always try to do that. there’s a lot of cool stuff out there. I was talking to my buddy at this company, Fox AE. they made a 3d where. Jurors could actually put on a 3d set of goggles and be inside. Like for one of ’em, it was a trip and fall where someone where if you were walking through this area, you wouldn’t have seen like where the caution sign was just to get someone’s perspective on that. And then it was like, there was a bicycle accident. There was a car accident and all these recreations, which, could you imagine if you brought in. VR sets for your entire jury, right? I It would be amazing. So all those things just keep adding ’em up. Do, as much as you can, the client is obviously the most important thing. And if you’re . Putting your client in your case, in the best position to, to really make an impact you’re gonna do well. I think. That’s

Chris Dreyer

So are is it one of these things you’re cruising just the regular store and you’re like, oh, I could use that for my trial. Have you had those types of scenarios?

Kyle Newman

Yes or so? I, yeah okay. So the other day, okay. I have this this it’s of like a GoPro it’s called the Insta 360. but it’s basically a GoPro with two lenses on one on either side. So when you use it, it’s simultaneously records everything around you. And then once you record the video, you can go into the app and literally take your phone and look around Where you were in that video. Okay. So it dawned on me, I was doing an inspection. Okay. And in this case it was a really bad. Ankle fracture, where my client was a construction guy and went into this hardware store. Okay. And when you would go into the hardware store he tripped and fell in a staircase in the middle of the store. Okay. So when you would go into the store, the staircase was only visible from the first aisle when you would walk in. Okay. And what ended up happening at the time of the accident was they improperly they stacked up all these product boxes, right? In that aisle to a level, it was 60 inches that we figured out through measuring, the boxes that were there. And we stacked them up at the, during the inspection to see what it would look like. If I walked in what my perspective would be. Okay. Because basically what happened was he walked in, didn’t see the staircase continued to walk to the back of the store, did some shopping. He had never been there and then came back up to the front where this whole staircase was. Basically walled off by like product shelf. So you again, couldn’t see it. And he basically turned the corner, took one step. He was looking at like products on the shelf and went down those stairs bad. Okay. And when you looked at the surveillance video, it was almost laughable to, it’s terrible to say, when we first got the case and put it in suit, the defense firm was like, you don’t have a case. There’s nothing, but when we did it okay. With the 360 camera. It was absolutely incredible. They were actually asking, where could we get this thing? Like their own expert loved it so much. And because you were able to hold it and walk in and actually see what someone’s perspective would be. And it totally, it really proved the case. Maybe there’s some comparative on my guy, but it definitely got us over from a summary judgment motion. And it was really powerful. I. It really made the case. And these little things, we live in an age there’s so much great tech out there to, to play with, sky’s the limit, what you could think of with this stuff. Like I was thinking today using that same thing. So I told you I do a lot of medical malpractice work, but just to feel what it’s like to walk into a hospital, walk into A surgical floor where patients are, what that feeling is. And you could do that with this and just walk in and look around and see what’s going on. Something like that puts, puts a juror or an audience in that, perspective. Because a lot of times people will have a difficult time gaining that perspective, just trying to imagine it because people aren’t. Don’t do this stuff every day. So they can’t, think of it on their own.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah, and I like all of the medians and examples of used even the shower, like holding it, the weight you can actually feel. Oh, that was the oppos to sum tone. Yeah. It’s just incredible. And it’s so out of the box too, because when you’re, you just don’t expect that you’re gonna see a presentation like this. Yeah. So it’s like engaging, it draws your attention to it too, and it makes it memorable because it is different.

Kyle Newman

Absolutely. I’ll tell you another story. Using this trial tech, another problem that I had was showing MRIs or like x-rays is that I would have my expert and he’d be like showing a laptop. Okay. To like showing like a little laptop screen to the juror, jury and trying to pick out like these little things or you back in the day, you’d have the film print out of the actual imaging you’d be trying to print. It was like a joke, and you could blow it up, but you couldn’t interact with it. So it was really clunky, at least to me. Some I’m sure some other guys have different tactics for this, but I tried it all and I was having a terrible time. One of my first, really big, it was an orthopedic malpractice case where it was an osteocondral fracture of the knee. Okay. And this doctor didn’t take out a piece of what he thought was cartilage, but it was actually cartilage and bone. Okay. And we showed it on the projector and it was just a little piece of bone that if you were just a lay person, you wouldn’t see. And during deliberations, what did the jury ask? They asked for Mr. Newman put up the MRI again. So I raced over, got it all set, made it super bright so that they could see it and that won the case. Wow. Just alone having that, if I didn’t have it I I would’ve lost. So that’s

Chris Dreyer

I’m a visual learner too, trying to and just there’s different. Inflections and how you present things that works it’s magic, but when you get to see it or feel it it also just adds to it. So I think that’s incredible.

Kyle Newman

You want to engage the senses as much as possible? That’s that from little, for your little kid this children’s book that I, I have a five year old that I read to him that it’s all about your senses and that’s how people learn. You don’t know how people. You wanna engage as many of those things as possible to make an impact on them. And this is just a way to do it,

Chris Dreyer

With over 20,000 followers on Instagram. Kyle offers his advice on how to build a social audience.

Kyle Newman

All of my stuff is really just taken from ideas that I get around the office that like actually happen. Like I’ll be on the phone with an adjuster and they say something I’m like ding, or I watch a video, a movie at night and I’m like, oh, that’s a great quote. there’s such an amazing community of plaintiff’s attorneys out there that I never, working in New York and, being so deep into trial practice, I really didn’t have that much time to go out and meet people in California or in Arizona, or, in, in Florida and really learn from them as well. And I think that is such an amazing thing with social media, that I’ve made so many friends on social and that refer cases and I’ll refer cases to them and that are just a great resource. To learn from, that you might have questions about. And I think just trying to be your authentic self, if you look at my stuff that when I first really started doing it, it was like me in a full suit in front of a green street screen talking about New York car access. It wasn’t me. It was just, it looks silly now, but I think you have to try to be authentic. I think that the guys that really do it well, there’s a lot of them out there. they know what their brand is. They know what their good at and what their authentic self is. And it really shows you.

Chris Dreyer

I’ve talked to many of my clients that are like, oh, we don’t get anything from social. Now, go look at their social follow and they’ll have 300 followers. Or 600 followers and you’re saying, Hey, it’s education. It’s networking communication. So I think it’s just looking at it different from a goal perspective.

Kyle Newman

Each of these platforms, you need to understand what they do. Okay. How they work. It’s a social platform. So you have to go out of your way to be social. can’t just be silent, and I’m not just talking about like the stuff that you post, If you like something, not only like it, but leave a meaningful comment that someone might actually appreciate. And that’s the way that you make connections through this and that you find out, oh, these are real people. I have a lot of common with them. We could be friends, I might see them one day, I have a lot in common with these people that I never even knew existed. So that’s the way to do it. You really want to, interact with them. I think that’s a problem that a lot of people have. It not only that they just post the same recycled stuff where you can, pay a social media marketing firm just to do for you. And that really doesn’t add anything. So the best thing that, that you can do is try to just be yourself, go out there and interact with people that you like, and you’re gonna find your niche and you’ll find what, my stuff ended up. I’m just, a funny guy, I that’s the most part. What most people. Think about my stuff. You’re just funny, Kyle. So I run with it. I do, some serious stuff and I love talking about trial practice. And like I said, it’s really just what kind of comes up in my mind. That’s how that’s my process. And that’s how I work,

Chris Dreyer

And I think when you’re unpacking your brain, it’s not yeah, how do I make, this is just me. And you don’t have to think about the content creation as much from. Strategy and planning or research perspective, it’s like your own knowledge, your own personality, your own experiences. The other thing too, is I see a lot of attorneys. It’s it’s like phone, I posted the content. I’m good. So you’ll see a couple good comments, but there’s no reply. There’s no engagement, but once you post the content, that’s the starting point is because the engagement and the comments helps show it to more feeds, helps it get reshared. It helps you get the follows.

Kyle Newman

Exactly. Yeah, exactly. Anyone that’s starting out, trying to use it, as a marketing tool should read Expert Secrets by Russell Bronson, that book. Totally changed my entire outlook on all of this stuff. the big light bulb moment for me is going from a content consumer to a creator. me probably five years ago, I was like, most people, I had just crap on my feed, whether it was YouTube or Instagram, whatever That was just mindless stuff. So once you get rid of that stuff and you focus on the creation part and become a creator, then you’re taking everything in real life and bringing it into your own personal brand that makes you authentic. and I’ll think of something I’m constantly thinking about it. And then it makes it a lot easier to produce, content.

Chris Dreyer

And if you’re being you’re having fun, right? Yeah. Yeah. Then it’s not worth

Kyle Newman

When it gets too stressful, that’s when I take a little break. I don’t think it should be like that. And I will say that going into this, I never thought it would be as positive. You hear a lot about people that are troll like trolls and nasty people for the vast majority of people that I interact with that are both new and people that I’ve known for a long time to follow me and that I follow them. It’s so positive, especially with the other lawyers out there, people are so encouraging and just, grateful and just wonderful people. And I think that in the plaintiff’s bar, especially the younger guys and girls we’re all cut from the same cloth to a certain extent. We have a lot of the same problems, a lot of the same, highs and lows, and we can relate to one another. Weird is cool. That’s what I always say. Just be weird,

Chris Dreyer

Take a side be different. Cause D you stand out. Totally. Totally Kyle, this has been amazing. There’s so many actual pieces of advice that you share with our audience. what’s next for Kyle Newman?

Kyle Newman

What’s next for Kyle Newman? The biggest cases, biggest trial verdicts in New York. That’s what I’m going for. It’s been a kind of weird two years especially here in New York. I see a lot of my colleagues across the country where the courts have really done an amazing job of getting back, and to, to a certain degree of normalcy. Here in New York, the reality is. That the courts are not fully back here. They are, have been very slow to get back. It’s a lot of backlog and a lot of waiting now. It’s like all these cases that we’re ready to go, they’re still just sitting, waiting. I think this September and going on, it’s gonna be a lot of action, but I’m just focused on, getting great results for my clients and growing the practice and doing what I love,

Chris Dreyer

Technology can help juries empathize with clients and result in larger verdicts. But the heavy lifting comes from knowing your audience and connecting with them in an authentic way. Building credibility requires knowing your case backwards and forwards, staying organized and engaging the jury and respecting their time. I’d like to think Kyle Newman from James Newman, PC for sharing his story with us. And I hope you gained some valuable insights from the convers. You’ve been listening to personal injury mastermind. I’m Chris Dreyer. If you like this episode, leave us a review. We love to hear from our listeners. I’ll catch you on next. Week’s PIMM with another incredible guest and all the strategies you need to master personal injury marketing.

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