94. Elliot Roe, Mindset Coach Eliminating Your Limiting Beliefs

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Elliot Roe discovered the potential power of hypnotherapy whilst searching for a solution to his own mental obstacles, and, wanting to share the resource with others, swiftly trained in the craft himself. Having spent over a decade developing a unique coaching style that incorporates mindset training, high performance training, and hypnotherapy, Elliot now coaches top performers in a variety of high stakes industries, and is considered one of the best mindset coaches in the world.

In this episode, Elliot shares with us his own experiences with hypnotherapy and mindset training, as well as his best tips for overcoming mental obstacles and reaching a state of peak performance.

Whats In This Episode

  • Who is Elliot Roe?
  • In what ways do mindset coaching and business coaching differ?
  • When, and to whom, can mindset coaching be most beneficial?
  • How can we identify and overcome limiting beliefs?
  • What impact can hypnotherapy have when combined with mindset coaching?
  • How can adopting positive habits impact your daily performance?
  • Why is it important to understand the difference between being busy and being productive?

Transcript

Elliot Roe

Poker problems aren’t specific poker problems. They’re human problems. In the same way that they’re human problems in sport or in business.

Chris Dreyer

Whatever goal you’re aiming for, if what you should be doing, but you’re struggling to motivate yourself to actually do it, mindset training can be just the ticket.

Elliot Roe

It’s helping people just really start to understand what emotions are getting in the way of them being the best version of them. So it’s these sort of overarching key themes of people’s emotions and how that impacts their life that I’m working on as a coach.

Chris Dreyer

You’re listening to personal injury mastermind show where elite personal injury attorneys and leading edge marketers give you exclusive access to growth strategies for your firm. Elliot Roe is one of the best mindset coaches in the world. His clientele includes high-stakes poker players, Olympic athletes, and Hollywood actors, as well as many successful entrepreneurs and executives. Elliot employs a unique combination of mindset training high performance training, and hypnotherapy to help his clients overcome mental obstacles and introduce the positive practices they need to optimize their performance and achieve both personal and professional growth. We sat down and discuss the importance of healthy habits, the difference between being busy and being productive and the role of hypnotherapy in tackling limiting beliefs. I’m your host, Chris Dreyer, founder, and CEO of rankings.io. We help elite personal injury attorneys dominate first page rankings with search engine optimization. An important first step for any lawyer is to really understand the people around them, so let’s get to know our guest. To get things started, I asked Elliot what the difference is between mindset coaching and traditional businesses.

Elliot Roe

If you think about traditional business coaching, typically it’d be tactical or strategic coaching. So you’ll be talking to your business coach and perhaps you’ve got issues with staffing or HR. You might have issues around taxes or strategy level changes that you want to make to your marketing plan for the business. Something along those lines. The work that I do is much more typically around the founder or the CEO, helping them understand why they’re not doing the things they know they should be doing. So, you a lot of us look at our businesses and we’ll say, if we were looking in from the outside, there’ll be some advice we would be giving that we’re not taking ourselves. And the mindset side of this is understanding why you’re not doing the things, you should be.

Chris Dreyer

I find myself doing that occasionally. I would say the most common situation is if someone asked me about an employee that’s struggling, I can automatically give that piece of advice. Hey, you need to get rid of that individual. Whereas internally I might have that same situation and struggle with it a little bit more.

Elliot Roe

And that’s because it’s bringing up an emotion for you. So a fear of judgment, a fear of upsetting the person, a fear of what it means about you. If you haven’t been able to train that person effectively, or, sense of failure that might come with that. So that’s exactly the sort of thing I would be helping a CEO with is, Hey, wait a minute. We know we have to let go of this member of staff for an emotional reason. You’re not doing this. And that means more strategic coaching can’t help that because you already know the answer. And that’s where mindset coach comes in.

Chris Dreyer

That’s absolutely so true. And it’s funny to hear you say it that way, because I call myself a robot Chris would do this and you work with a lot of top poker players. I mean, I think you’ve got some bracelet winners, a world series of poker champion, I believe you coached and just a wide variety of industries, but first, what drew you to working with poker players?

Elliot Roe

So I’d been working with some golfers and had some success and, randomly I had a friend who was working in the poker industry. And she said, Hey, if you’re helping golfers with putting, have you ever thought about helping poker players with stress on final tables? Because there are millions of dollars on the line and typically they know what to do, but they’re not able to do it. So it’s back to that same theme. So I effectively, I just started advertising online on forums saying, are you a poker player? Would you like to work with a hypnotherapist mindset coach for free? I want to test and see if this works. And it went really well and they started winning more money. And then it just started spiraling from that point. And I, like you said, I had extraordinarily fortunate results in poker. I had guys when, I mean, it’s over a hundred million dollars. So really significant tournament wins including the main event and the super high roller balls. So some of the real premium events in poker and through that, I became really well known and that became my big niche for a number of years. And with professional poker players, a lot of the time they’re playing with top people from other industries. So there might be professional athletes at the table. There might be guys from the stock exchange on the table. There might be business owners at the table and they were recommending me to those other areas. And then it ended up that I’ve just ended up working now probably with more business owners and founders than poker players, but it’s all been from that word of mouth recommendation. And a lot of it came from the success that I saw poker.

Chris Dreyer

That’s really interesting. I never thought of it from that avenue, but the individuals that are playing poker, typically they have a side income maybe that allows them to participate in these high level events. I’ve got some mutual friends that, Eric Crane, Ray Monaghan, Ryan Carter, Adrienne Rowsome you know that you’re mutually acquainted with that are just true and blue poker players. But yeah, I would imagine there’s a lot of connections. Working with these other industries, do you find your approach, differing by industry, or is it a lot of the same things that you teach? Can you apply those to different tracks, different career trajectory?

Elliot Roe

Where we’re really fortunate is this crossover in almost everything that I work in. So what I’m looking at is helping people perform at their best in their chosen career and, poker problems, aren’t specific poker problems, they’re human problems in the same way that they’re human problems in sport or in business. And it’s helping people just really start to understand what emotions are getting in the way of them being the best version of themselves. So the fear of failure at a poker table is no different to the fear of failure in a cage fight or the fear of failure when you’re trying to grow your business. So it’s these sort of overarching key themes of people’s emotions and how that impacts their life that I’m working on as a coach, rather than I can help you play poker from a technical approach.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah. Listening to Naval Ravikant and he broke it down into status and wealth where like a status as a zero sum game, there’s a winner and there’s a loser and a lot of sports are related to status. Do you find that a lot of those emotional types of dilemmas that these individuals are dealing with are more of the status? We’re worried about what people will think or does it stem from that? Or there is a lot more than that?

Elliot Roe

So what other people will think, but a lot of it’s actually the self-worth or the individual and where they believe they deserve. And this is especially true when it comes to the business owners around different financial levels. So I’ll speak to business owners who’ve been making the same amount of money every year for the last five years, and they can’t understand why they can’t get past this level. And a lot of the time it’s because they’ve set like a self-worth level that they believe they should be making. And past that point in their uncomfortable an example of this everyone I think is aware of is lottery winners. It is very normal for them to go broke a few years later and that’s because they, they don’t actually believe at a subconscious level that deserve that money. So you’ll see an awful lot of lottery winners find ways of losing that money, giving away that money. And they usually end up back where they were and that’s because that’s where they’re comfortable being. And all of us do this to some extent. And, in my case, I’m just getting clients coming to me saying, Hey, I don’t understand why I’m staying. But the data shows that I’m stuck. Can you help me get unstuck so that I can understand how we can reach the next level? And oftentimes, there are strange things that come up. One of the themes I’ve seen many times is men not being able to get past the highest wage of their father. So if their father earned a hundred thousand a year, they’re at a hundred thousand, or if they’re a million, they’re at a million, but in some way, making more money than their dad had ever made sort of undermines their father and might damage the relationship. So they’re not consciously aware of this, but I do see that as a theme and that doesn’t have to be that as a trigger, but oftentimes we’ve picked up a level that we believe we’re worth. And then we’re kept at that level until we work through it.

Chris Dreyer

So I’ve heard this references, like those ceilings, those limiting beliefs, those mental obstacles. A lot of our audience are EOS or traction business owners, and they set these one three and ten-year goals. And even myself, I always ask myself, am I thinking too small? Would I approach this differently? If my goal was larger or. Have I set a ceiling on myself when I’m establishing these goals. And what are the steps that an individual could take to try to lift that ceiling or think bigger?

Elliot Roe

So the work that I do predominantly is hypnotherapy. So we would use the emotion around that goal setting process as a starting. So hypnotherapy, there’s no magic. It’s not like stage shows, I’m not clicking my fingers and people are sleeping. Oh. But what it does too, is it puts you in a very relaxed state and allows you to focus intensely on one emotion. And as it does that, it will tend to bring up thoughts and memories related to that, which explain your behavior. So what will happen is we’ll go into the session and we’ll start talking about, so how were you feeling as you were setting up. Why were you setting the goals this way? How would it have felt if those goals were twice as large and typically the client will say something like. The thought of those goals being twice as large, made me feel a bit sick or make me feel tension in my chest or whatever, it might be some kind of physical sensation related to those numbers being higher from that point, I’ll then say, when else have you felt that way in your life? And then they’ll start bringing up a series of memories, typically that explain self-worth self-love issues or judgment issues from parents, et cetera which we then work through because that’s where the emotion that’s what. Th the gold point is coming from that being said larger goals. Aren’t always better for everybody. If you’re very happy in your life and you don’t need the accesses, which most people don’t need absolute success, there might not be a good reason to set extraordinarily high goals. It comes down to what you want out of your life and how you want your life to look and what sort of balance you want with your family. But it’s really worth exploring these things and understanding am I sitting these goals because this is perfect for me? Or am I sitting in these goals because I’m scared of sitting any higher?

Chris Dreyer

It’s incredible. And that’s a really powerful way of looking at that. And, in terms of hypnotherapy, I was researching, you were introduced to it originally because of a fear of flying and facing these fears is a big part of what you do, but could you explain that story of how you’re first introduced to it and how it impacted you?

Elliot Roe

I had a fear of flying, which was pretty substantial. A short haul flight, three or four hours, would be enough to ruin a couple of weeks before the vacation and then ruined the vacation. As I knew I’d be coming back because I was so scared and then long haul flights, I turned down a number of holidays. Just because I didn’t wanna get on the plane friend recommended hypnotherapy. I was very skeptical as I think most people are because we don’t have a good understanding of it. Normally and went to a hypnotherapist. She got me into that relaxed state that we described and asked me to talk about the feelings I have around flying. So again, for me, it was a sickness in stomach and a pressure in my chest. That’s how I feel my anxiety. And she still asked me to start bringing up memories. And initially I brought up some memories of turbulence, but I came up with a very early memory of being at my grandfather’s house, being shown a picture of a plane, small, a small plane, and being told that it crashed and killed a business partner. So I now had an understanding as to why I thought planes were dangerous. As a child, I was told that it could have effectively, in my mind, killed my granddad. Now, what was interesting is that wasn’t a conscious memory of. Going into the session. So when I saw my mum next, I said, oh, did this really happen? This is what came up. I feel different about flying. And she’s of course you remember that plane crashed. And I didn’t remember. So what was really interesting to me is I felt completely different about flying after that point. And I brought up a memory that I had no awareness of, and that doesn’t always happen in hypnotherapy, but sometimes it does. I could then get on a plane without feeling the anxiety, which is a huge life-changing thing for me. And from that, I went and got trained as a therapist thinking it would be, I say a fun hobby of being able to cure friends and families, anxieties. And then again, with a word of mouth thing, as you start helping. They tell their friends who told their friends who told their friends, and then it turned into a business that was better. I was working in solar energy investments, so completely different world. But I enjoyed hypnotherapy much more and it just started building and it became rational to switch across.

Chris Dreyer

That’s incredible. And so if an individual has these mental obstacles and they’re wanting to perform at peak performance, and a lot of our personal injury attorneys are listening are in these high stakes trials, it’s the epitome of a zero sum game. There’s a winner and there’s a loser. There can be tremendous amount of investments going into these like what are the steps that you would do to even determine what maybe some of these spindle obstacles would be?

Elliot Roe

I think the first way of looking at it is doing a breakdown of what would I tell someone else to be doing in this situation? So to create a list or a another one that’s really good is think of who you believe is the best in your industry. Write down the things you believe they do to prepare. And then see if you put a tick or a cross next to them as to whether you were doing the same things. So then we have some data, so we can say, oh, you’re doing everything that you believe you should be doing. Or we can say. Hey, there’s a list here and half of the list, you’ve got a cross next to it. So you know exactly what you should be doing, but you’re choosing not to. Why are you choosing not to? And then we’d look at the different performance areas of the trial itself. Is there an anxiety going into it? Do you believe that you can perform your best in that high pressure moment? Do you have court cases that you’ve been in previously where you know that you haven’t performed at your best?
And then we would look through what was happening in those cases, where there was some emotion, some stress, some anxiety, fear of failure, self-sabotage whatever it might be getting in the way. And then we’ll work through those issues.

Chris Dreyer

Overcoming mental obstacles is a crucial part of unlocking your full potential, but having a healthy routine is also key. Nutrition, sleep, exercise, and meditation can all impact performance. I asked Elliot if he could elaborate on the role of positive habits and share a few that he has found particularly useful for himself.

Elliot Roe

So interestingly, I actually use a sleep coach. And I find that really useful for me. I use some sleep as a skill, Malia sleep as a skill and really digging into the data. So I use an Oura ring that gives you data every morning and you can see your HRV, the different stages of sleep that you’ve had. How many times you’ve woken up, gives you the exercise that you’ve done before. Your body temperature, your heart rate, and you can see these trends over time. And then as you adjust your behaviors, you can see what impacts you as an individual and what doesn’t impact you as an individual. So things like it sounds strange, but making sure that you get sunlight in the more. You start to see these changes in data of how we’ve slept in the evening, the temperature of the room, the temperature of the house during the day, versus the temperature of the house at night. I use a product called Ooler by chilipad, and that’s it’s a mattress topper that calls the bed while you’re sleeping. But the important thing is that you’re actually looking at the data and seeing what works for you. So for me, as I’m trying these different enhancements for my sleep, what I’m looking for is these shifts to say, okay, well that was worthwhile. This isn’t worthwhile. And then how does that, what is the data in terms of the numbers? How does that make me feel? Or how does that make me perform in my sessions? So I do that personally and then with my clients, we’re looking at, so the sleep side of things like that, as well as exercise, diet, life balance, socializing with friends and family meditation, or some form of mindfulness to try and build. Enough of it I would say ed a fence around their psychology. So you’re building a robust, physical being so that when you’re in these high pressure situations, you have a much better chance of performing. And like you said, the court cases are a zero sum game and that’s no different to poker or certainly a cage fight or something along those lines. And effectively, all we’re looking to do is get a few percentage points better than your opponent. So if you’re going into a court case and you are better rested and you exercise a lot, so you can deal better with stress than the other side, and you meditate so you can’t be thrown off very easily and you can refocus your mind very quickly. Each one of those things, they might not make a huge difference individually, but as all of this starts to compound and gives you a larger and larger edge. And what I saw in the poker is as I was getting poker players to do this, they would have what would seem like insurmountable edges in some cases versus opponents who technically. They weren’t necessarily better than their opponent. They’re probably equal skill levels, but we’re just building on all of these different areas, as well as doing that deeper mindset work, to overcome the, the bigger issues in the background. And then they had that still very high level of success in that industry.

Chris Dreyer

I would imagine too these individuals, even having a coach like yourself, where you’re constantly accountable and you get in these different habits and cadences, when you sit down at the table, there’s probably a natural. Intrinsic like confidence that you have, knowing that you’ve went through these steps and you’ve prepared and you’ve taken all these actions to, to really be the best you can be.

Elliot Roe

I think there is a confidence that comes with knowing you’ve done everything that you can do, because then even if it doesn’t work out, you’re not going to be punishing yourself. Because if you’ve done everything you can do, you’ve done everything you can do in that situation. However, if you do finish that performance and there was a long list of things that you didn’t bother with, then you’re always going to look back and wish you’d made that change. Or, worryingly sometimes the not doing those things is actually ego protection. So they don’t set themselves up for success. And then if they lose, they have the excuse of, well, if I’d try it, I would have won. And that’s something, certainly if you’re talking about zero sum games, that’s something you have to be really aware of. Is am I not doing these things to protect my ego so that I’ve got an out. And oftentimes that will come from again, when we go through the memories that come up being back in school, being the clever kid in school, not having to work hard for exams, certainly in the earlier years. And then the exams as they get harder, not studying. Being happy with Bs and Cs, saying well if I tried, I would’ve got an a, I would’ve got the top mark, but not allowing themselves to try because trying and failing is much scarier than not trying at guaranteeing a worst result. And it’s these sorts of ego protections that are often going on in the background, again, especially in zero sum games.

Chris Dreyer

I’d imagine too there, the individuals around you are telling you, oh, you don’t even have to study.

Elliot Roe

Yeah. It’s as if your grade is worth more because you didn’t try.

Chris Dreyer

Incredible. And these intrinsic, these are like, self-beliefs. I imagine changing these are significantly more difficult than are steps you can take, right?
You can create habits to influence better sleep, better nutrition, exercise, and mindfulness. And every individual has some areas where they’re lacking. How difficult or how challenging is it to change those intrinsic beliefs? The beliefs that you have that you just think are set in stone?
Is that a whole, I mean, there’s a deeper process.

Elliot Roe

I mean, it’s certainly not one session. But we are working with a subconscious modality and that’s where I think it’s so important to be working with a subconscious modality rather than just a conscious modality. So if this was talking therapy I believe it would be much more difficult to change those core beliefs because you’re talking about it on a conscious level and you’re not actively disrupting the program behind it. With having a therapy and a few other modalities you’re working with the subconscious mind rather than the conscious mind. So the way I like to describe it is it’s not like you’re moving the windows around the windows page.
You’re changing the DAS programming behind it. So if you think of hypnotherapy like that, whereas traditional talk therapy or CBT something along those lines, you’re having to work at the higher level, because you are consciously doing that work and there can be changed, but oftentimes it takes an awful lot longer to get that same level of change if you’re taking that more conscious approach.

Chris Dreyer

And on each of those areas, like maybe what are some. For our audience listening, maybe there’s some tools or just general tips in each of those four main areas. You mentioned the sleep nutrition, exercise and mindfulness. What are some of the, like the basic foundational things that you recommend in those areas?

Elliot Roe

I mean, the first thing is habit and consistency. With all of those areas, that building consistency is more important than anything else. When it comes to sleep, making sure that you’re waking up at the same time every day and ideally going to bed at the same time every day. And this is weekends as well. So you’re creating a very solid, robust routine for your sleep. When it comes to exercise, things that I found useful for me and my clients is utilize a trainer. You can outsource your motivation. And I think a lot of people don’t think about doing that. So there’ll be saying, Hey, no, I want to be driven. I want to do the exercise. Which is wonderful. And you can spend an awful lot of time working on that. But realistically, when you’re exhausted, it’s quite hard to get up at six in the morning and go for a run. However, I mean, the way that I do it, I have a trainer comes to my house five days a week. I’m not, I don’t miss a gym session because there’s someone at my house and I’m in a fortunate situation. That’s something I can afford, but that gives me the energy to, instead of all of that energy, I would have been spending on trying to make sure my exercise was going ahead. That can now be put into my business and my family. So there’s extra capacity there. So outsourcing in as many areas as you can, the, of the difficult decisions, and I’m sure a lot of the people listening to this, you can’t afford to do that. And that’s a simplistic change to make. And so many people want to fight it rather than accepting. Oftentimes there’s an easy way of making the change.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah on the exercise front. It’s really interesting. I’ve never thought of it in that manner is, if I’m going to, if I have a gym membership, I may make an excuse not to go or not find time, but I find that the best success I’ve had personally is when I’ve worked with a personal trainer, especially if it’s like a younger kid, and their commission and their lifestyle are dependent upon me showing up. It’s I don’t miss meetings. So if someone else is setting the meeting and they’re, depending upon me, I’ll go and I’ll have that consistency. And the other thing that I’ve always thought about. If we could hire a business coach to tell us exactly what to do to make more money, it would make sense to hire that business coach. And that’s essentially what a personal trainer is.

Elliot Roe

Yeah. I love your description in terms of, if it’s someone else’s life. You’re much less likely to punish them in that way, because you’re feeling a bit tired. So yeah, just, if you can set it up, I would say, just certainly do. These are very simplistic things that can impact your life, not just now, but it’s really the compounding of these things over decades. So when I set exercise goals at the moment I’m setting 10 year exercise goals. So when I was in my thirties, I was looking to be in better shape at 40 than 30. Now I’m at 40, I’m looking to be in better shape at 50 than 40, but I’m not looking to be in better shape next week, but I’m looking at this as an overarching. This is a lifestyle of being fit and healthy over years and years. And that’s going to compound so much when I’m 70. So at 70 years old, the fact that I’ve been living my life this way, the quality of life, I would assume will be much higher. So as long as they don’t pick up some injury on the way, but it’s like this mindset of that sort of the very long-term thinking rather than the, I need to look great for my vacation in three weeks. I’m going to go on a crash diet because that doesn’t have the consistency to have the real quality of life change. And again, it’s the same for the sleep I’m working on my sleep, not just for how I feel this week or how it is for my clients this week, if I’m slightly sharper. But what does this mean 10 years from now? If I’ve been getting better sleep for 10 years, what does it mean in 30 years? When I’m in my seventies and eighties, what does that mean with my chances of dementia or Alzheimer’s things like that. So it’s all about this. Just compounding everywhere. We can get a little bit of an edge and accepting that there’s always an expert somewhere who knows more about it than me. And, I’m happy to pay those people. If it improves my quality of life.

Chris Dreyer

It reminds me of that quote. It’s like, how do you eat an elephant? And it’s one bite at a time or something. It seems really overwhelming, but you have to just be consistent. It also makes me think of that 8th wonder of the world is compounding that quote by Einstein and just how that can impact things besides just money. It could be sleep nutrition, exercise, mindfulness. Looking after yourself, mentally and physically, and really help you achieve a peak state of performance. But once you’ve harness that energy and motivation, where do you direct it? Elliot teaches that there is a big difference between being busy and being productive. So I asked him to explain how he works with his clients to ensure they’re using their time wisely.

Elliot Roe

A lot of the time there, again it’s the client doing a lot of the analysis because they’re going to be the expert in their area. But we’re looking for where the biggest levers are in that. There, there are going to be certain things, certain activities, certain meetings you can be having, which are the big levers that change everything. And then there’s the busy work where you can say you’ve worked 10 hours today. And oftentimes that self-sabotage, I was describing to you is around the big leavers that change everything. It’s I mean, ironically, as you’re saying it’s the firing the member of staff who needs to be fired. And you can keep yourself really busy and you can make excuses as to why you can’t do that right now, but the thing that changes your business, if you have a poisonous member of staff and your business, the most powerful thing you can do is the difficult thing, which is letting them go. So we’re looking for those sorts of things in my clients’ businesses or the sport, wherever it might be, where the thing that they know is the hardest thing to do, but it might be a very small action that has an enormous change. Versus the Hey, but I’m working very hard and waking up at this time, I’m always on the phone. I’m always in meetings. It’s but yeah are they the meetings that are actually going to move the needle? And typically the self-sabotage is around the difficult thing that will move the needle the most. Does that make sense?

Chris Dreyer

It does. And is that a back and forth conversation where they have to finally understand and be accountable and make that decision, or do you help them? Get to that with advice, or is it more, they have to make that decision internally to move forward?

Elliot Roe

I mean, I see any form of coaching and certainly the type of coaching I do is teamwork. So I’m not telling someone what to do. I’m helping them along the way to make the decisions for the team that they have the knowledge as to what will impact their business the most. But oftentimes you need a third party looking in to be able to say, Hey, wait a second. You’ve just told me X, X. It doesn’t sound like you’re doing those things. Shall we dig into this? Why is this not happening? How would this sound? If one of your friends was telling you this about their business, what would your take be if this wasn’t you, this was someone else? And as soon as they start framing it from a third party perspective, things start to become clearer. And then we start working on why were these emotions coming up, hiding this, creating these blind spots for you. And as I say, that’s where the deepest of conscious work comes in.

Chris Dreyer

A couple of final questions Elliot, and this has been fantastic. This has really got my mind racing is, how can, what are the steps that a person needs to take in order to consider a mindset coach? Like who, who is mindset, coaching and performance coaching for? Is it for anyone it’s, how do they make this decision?

Elliot Roe

It’s for any one to some extent. So obviously there are different coaches at different prices and certainly not every coach is for everybody, but you need to want to have more in your life.
So if you’re absolutely happy with where you’re at and you’re content and you’re enjoying your life, then potentially mindset coach isn’t for you. If you’re looking at your life and you’re saying, I know I could be doing more. I don’t understand why I am, where I am at 40, or, I’m feeling there’s this potential here, but I don’t know how to tap into it. Then you’re someone who should be speaking to a mindset coach. And also it’s the, if you don’t know what to do, You need a business coach, if you know what to do, but you’re not doing it, then you need to mindset. So that’s the distinction. So there’s a lot of people who need, they need a business coach. They don’t need me, they, they need to know what to do first. There are also a lot of people out there who, they’ve done all of the courses. They’ve watched all the videos. They’ve been speaking to a business coach for the last three years, and he’s telling them the same thing every week. And it’s still not happening. You already know the answers, it’s yourself holding yourself back. And that’s when you want to make the switch from someone on the more strategic business side to someone who’s going to help you get out of your own way, because you have the answers already. You just have to be able to commit and make those choices.

Chris Dreyer

I think that’s the perfect explanation of when to get tactical with the business coach versus the mindset coach. And I really appreciate that, that explanation because it makes it really, it makes a lot of sense to me, Elliot, this has been fantastic. And where can our audience go to learn more?

Elliot Roe

My website is elliotroe.com and there’s an application form, and I have a number of coaches. So we can usually find someone to work with you no matter what level that you’re at. And then I have an app primed mind, which you can download for free on the iTunes store and on Google play, if you check that out prime mind, and then you can listen to the audio is I think there’s about 43 audios on it from everything, from sleep to confidence and that suggestion hypnosis. So that’s more like a guided meditation, but it’ll give you an idea of the feeling of hypnotherapy. And then if you decide that you want to do the deeper, more progression working on yourself work then that’s when he would talk to a coach.

Chris Dreyer

Having spent over a decade, developing and refining his mindset and performance coaching system Elliot is a fountain of knowledge when it comes to optimizing your potential. Some of his tips involve making the smallest of changes to your daily routine. But like Elliot says, you’re looking for those few extra percentage points that could be deciding factor in a key moment, so every bit counts I’d like to thank Elliot Roe for sharing his story with us. And I hope you gained some valuable insights from the conversation you’ve been listening to the personal injury mastermind. I’m Chris Dreyer. If you liked this episode, leave us a review. We’d love to hear from our listeners. I’ll catch you on next week’s PIMM with another incredible guest and all the strategies you need to take your personal injury practice to the next level.

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