71. Brian LaBovick, LaBovick Law Group Sharing What You Know and Being a Warrior for Justice

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Brian LaBovick is the founder and CEO of LaBovick Law Group in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. Since 1991, his firm has won more than $400 Million for clients across a range of practice areas. His tenacity and commitment to being a Warrior for Justice has caused Brian to emerge as a leader, both in the personal justice field and his community.

Join us on this episode of The Rankings Podcast as we dive into Brians journey from a high schooler fighting a traffic ticket to one of the top lawyers in the country and how to strengthen your business by sharing your resources. Well also discuss Brians new book, Not A Good Neighbor, where he teaches readers how to navigate and represent themselves in automobile accident cases.

Transcript

Brian LaBovick

I like fighting. And that’s what, that’s what we do for a living. I mean, we’re paid to be the modern equivalent of a samurai gladiator for what’s. Right. And what’s just in the world

Chris Dreyer

as an attorney, you need passion and determination. If you want to try cases. And there are two characteristics of my guest today has an abundance.

Brian LaBovick

I literally will say to myself, I don’t care if I die at my desk. If it costs me the win, it’s like, I need to win more than I need to live. And that’s how driven we want to be in this law firm to win our cases.

Chris Dreyer

You’re listening to the rankings podcast to show where top marketers and elite personal injury attorneys share their stories about getting to the top and what keeps them there. My guest today is Brian LaBovick, CEO and founder of LaBovick law group. And best-selling author of “Not a Good Neighbor.”. Brian is well-known for his ruthless determination in the courtroom. And he’s installed a culture of relentlessly pursuing justice at his firm. In fact, he’s so passionate about shaving maximum justice even wrote a book about it, to enable people to represent themselves where hiring a lawyer might not be financially viable. I’m your host, Chris Dreyer, founder and CEO of Rankings.io. We help elite personal injury attorneys dominate first page rankings with search engine optimization. SEO is all about the first page. And that’s also where we’d like to start our show. Here’s Brian LaBovick, founder and CEO of LaBovick Law Group.

Brian LaBovick

I got a traffic ticket when I was in high school and I was a young, typical high school kid. And I had hair out to here, you know, typical, you know, uh, and I had a bandana on and I came out from working out at Gold’s gym every day. And on my way, home, a police officer gave me a ticket for making a right turn on red. And you could make a right turn on red in Ohio at the time, but I had made a right turn and I started to make it. And then I saw a sign that said, no right on red. So I stopped and I backed up. Police officer pulled beside me, looked at me. You know, here I am a punk kid in my mom’s car and they were like, we’ll check them out. And they pulled me over. They gave me a ticket for making a right turn on red. So I did thought it wasn’t fair. I, I fought the traffic ticket and I went to court and I had been to traffic court before to plead my case. So you go and you, you plead no contest. And you know, I’d had one prior traffic ticket cause I was a high school kid. And uh, and so I go in and I plead not guilty in the. You know, judges like, all right, we’ll get you a trial date. So I come back from my second trial date, I’m sitting with my parents because you know, like I’m scared to go to court alone. So I’m sitting with my mom and, uh, and a woman walks up to me and introduces herself and says, she’s the prosecutor, which I didn’t know, you know, like I was going to get a prosecutor. Like, what do you mean. So she said, well, you know, when you have at your trial, we have trial, blah, blah, blah. So I went in and I actually tried this case, right. And the judge kind of instructed me and got me to go through it. And I kept interrupting and doing it wrong. But at some point during the trial, when the officer was testifying, he started talking and I was like, that’s wrong, he’s wrong. You know? And the judge is like, sit down, you can cross examine him. And I grabbed a pad of paper and I started. Jotting down questions. And I, and I wrote question after question and these big, bold things, like ask them about this, ask them about this gospel of this. And I did like three pages of that by the time he was done with his testimony, I got up and I whipped him around. I mean, I was all over him and just, I I’ve always been a very natural cross-examination guy. And I just went after this guy’s high school, I was so angry and I was like, isn’t it true, blah, blah, blah. And you should have done blah, blah. And you said, blah, blah. And it was just leading question. After leading question, I wanted to get my points across and I did. And at one point he said, yeah, and I think the signs in the wrong place, but like, you know, so I was like, okay, the signs in the wrong place. And I kind of let it go at that. And then the next, there was two cops in the car. So the next cop comes in. And, you know, like she asked him what happens. He tells a little bit different story, but basically, you know, we gave this kid a ticket. They don’t remember me pulling backwards. They didn’t have any of that stuff in the report. And I’m sure they didn’t remember it at the time. I thought it was a giant conspiracy of these two lying officers against me, but I’m sure it was just, you know, that daily work. So I, I, I get up and I’m like, Hey, the other officer said the, the sign was out of place. If it was right here, it was out of place. Wasn’t it? And it was like maybe. And I was like, all right, no, no, no more questions. I sat down, judge found me not guilty and then asked me to come back into chambers female judge. She asked me to come back into chambers with her, sat me down and said, what are you doing? Set them on high school. She said, what do you want to be when you grow up? I was like, I think I want to be a doctor. I mean, my best friend wants to be a doctor and I’m taking AP physiology, AP chemistry, biology, you know, I’m doing all that stuff. And I kinda like it. It’s kind of interesting. She goes, no, no, no. You’re going to be a lawyer. You got to be a lawyer. What you did was incredible. I had people 10 years here as prosecutors, they don’t cross examine like that. That was amazing. And I walked out just feeling like that was my thing, you know? So that was it. I wanted to be a prosecutor after that. I was like, I’m just going to be a prosecutor. And I wanted to be a prosecutor until I became a prosecutor. So I, I graduated. I was a CLI for Janet Reno in the office. So I had that experience and it was amazing. My wife was a three-year prosecutor for Janet, uh, amazing office. I was, uh, I applied for the honors graduate department at the justice department, the undergraduate program at the justice department. And I got that very great position. So I went in as a United States department of justice attorney and, uh, And I was there and that’s where I kind of got my trial stripes. And when I came out, you know, like I decided after a short period of time, I didn’t want to be a prosecutor. I really wanted to make money as well in my life.

Chris Dreyer

So you, so you went to university of Miami school of law and you got this experience. You, you, you stayed in Miami, your whole career.

Brian LaBovick

I was in DC for a short period of time. So I actually, after I graduated, went to DC and yeah, came back.

Chris Dreyer

So, so you know why, man, why Miami, what, you know, what’s the PI scene like in Miami, you know, What are the specific challenges that you face in your local area?

Brian LaBovick

Okay. So I went to Miami for law school. I loved Miami for law school. I thought it was amazing. Um, and then after I came out of the justice department, I got a job with a guy that was a PI lawyer who didn’t want to go to court ever. So I got a job coming out in personal injury. I want it to be in personal injury. And, uh, I want it to be in personal and because I really grew up hating insurance companies. My dad was an insurance agent, my whole life. I was an insurance agent. I saw those people rip people and not want to pay on their claims. So I definitely had a, a bad taste in my mouth about insurance companies themselves. So that gave me some motivation to be in this field. Had a great job with a guy that did a hundred PI cases a month. And never went to court and would hire a young prosecutor and say, run, do what you want to do. So I had a great time in that job and I had a great time doing that work. But when I opened up on my own, I wanted to be in a place where I felt like was a little closer to home. I grew up in Dayton, Ohio, and you know, the Midwest is nice people. I didn’t know that people stole from each other. Yeah. Like I’m, you know, I’m an Ohio boy. I I’m, Pittsburgh is really my original town, everything on my walls and Steelers, I’m still black and gold here, but, um, But I want it to be in a nice place. So we ended up having an opportunity to move to Jupiter, Florida, which is the Palm beach County and treasure coast market. And that’s where I’ve been for 30 years. So I’m really practicing in that market.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah. And that, and that’s wonderful. And yet I’m from the Midwest and yeah, I, so I can certainly relate and, you know, With LaBovick law group, you’ve now earned more than $400 million for your clients. And you’ve been on the prosecutor side. So you got to see those strategies. You had a little background in the insurance, you know, what do you think contributed to your success? Was it getting the reps in, you know, what made you do that different as opposed to other personal injury attorneys that are maybe still trying to get to that seven figure Mark or, or, you know, how are you different?

Brian LaBovick

So, I think that we’re a little different because there’s a couple of pieces that make people successful, you know, personal injury lawyers, and there’s a lot of different levels to that success to be a personal injury lawyer. So there’s there’s guys who are very successful because their job is to. You know, bring a ton of cases in their advertising guys. And their thing is we run cases through. And if they’re really complex cases, we probably get a different type of affirm to try those really super complex, hard core cases. So that’s one level of success. The way that I did my success and it’s shown in our core values in the firm, right. Is that we live up to a certain, you know, vision of who we are as, as an entity. And I came out, I like to fight. I was a wrestler in high school. I thought I could wrestle in college. I could not. Wrestling college college wrestling is different than high school wrestling. It’s way harder. Uh, so, um, I joined the boxing team, uh, and then when I came out, I was in TaeKwonDo for a couple of years, and then I tried to MMA and that’s very painful. And I decided that I liked my face better than I liked fighting. So, you know, but I still, I like fighting and that’s what, that’s what we do for a living. I mean, we’re paid to be. The modern equivalent of a samurai gladiator for what’s. Right. And what’s just in the world. Right. So that was what I love doing. And, uh, and that’s what led me to do this job to, to fight for people,

Chris Dreyer

When I’m, doing my, my research for my guests. You know, I go to your website, I watch your watch your video. And I’m like, geez, this, this is a guy beside me. You know, he’s, he is not going to, you know, take be complacent is the thing that I got that like, I’m truly gonna get, you know, a competitive, um, someone who’s wanting to fight.

Brian LaBovick

Yup. Yup. What you really get is you get a team and a person who is driven to win and wants to win more than they want to live. That’s my that’s my feeling, right? So, so I’ll be at my desk and I’ll be working until four o’clock in the morning to get up at six o’clock in the morning to start trial at eight o’clock in the morning and I’ll have heart palpitations or whatever it is, that’s driving me crazy. Right. And I’ll say to myself, I literally will say to myself, I don’t care if I die at my desk. If it costs me the win, it’s like, I need to win more than I need to live. And that’s how driven. We want to be in this law firm to win our cases. That’s just a lot. That’s a lot of passion. That you know, all right. If this guy is that competitive, if that’s the motif we’re warriors for justice, we fight to win. We fight to maximize justice by aggressively fighting for our client’s rights. That’s our, our mission statement. And we live it, man.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah. And I was going to say what immediately came to mind was everybody’s probably rowing in the same direction and I’m sure if you hired someone that didn’t fit those values, it probably drove you crazy. They were probably first out the door.

Brian LaBovick

Yeah. You know, it’s good. You ended up building a culture of people around you that I don’t have to kick anybody out the door they’ll leave. And that people here will kick them out simply based on behavior. So we’ve had people that we like to play hard. Like we’re very work, hard, play hard office. We do a lot of play together. It was a lot of stuff that we like to do together. Um, but if you’re here and you’re the type of person who’s on your cell phone all day long, Your teammates will make it hard for you, right? There’ll be like, get off your phone. You’re not here to play. We got to get this stuff done. Like don’t talk to your mom anymore. Get like that, you know, stop talking to your boyfriend. I’m sorry that you’re breaking up, put it on a bubble, put your emotions on the shelf, get back to work. Let’s roll. You know, and that’s, that’s kind of like everybody here, right? We all just have that, like. We’re rolling it, you know, and then we go and we play, we’ll drank left Fon. We’ll laugh. We’ll take lunch breaks. We do. We have a fun committee. So I don’t want people to think that when they hear this, Oh my God, it’s a terrible place to work. It’s a, it’s an awesome place to work, but you got to work

Chris Dreyer

as well as establishing a successful and aggressively justice focused firm. Brian also managed to write a book, distilling his courtroom methods for others to use. As a guide, I asked him what inspired him to write the book and what he hopes the book will achieve.

Brian LaBovick

So two things compelled me to write the book. Number one is that I’ve recognized that my practice is not built to help everybody. And that there is a level of case that would probably be better off just getting it settled without having to pay a legal fee, because there’s just not enough in it when given all the factors to go out and get it done, even though it’s easy to get done. You know that we, I, you know, if it’s, uh, in, in Florida, I don’t know if you know anything about Florida law, but in Florida we don’t have any bodily injury minimums. So there’s a lot of people running around with zeros. But if you do have bodily injury, a lot of people have like 10 K. A 10 20 policy. So there’s $10,000 of gross amount that’s available in a case for a person. And by the time they get done with their medical bills and a little bit of lost wages and some property damage that they may have paid for fully or not rental bills for the car. There’s just, there’s no money in that case for the people themselves. So I’m going to end up taking a $3,300 fee. We’re going to take $500 in costs. We’re going to pay off, you know, some medical bills and the person’s going to be upside down $2,000. And they’re going to say, what the heck did I pay you for? Like what what’s going on here? They’d be much better off. Being able to take their medical bills, take their lost wages, give it to the insurance company in an organized fashion, get the $10,000 check, call it a day. I want it to give people that opportunity, right. And to do it with whatever level case they’re comfortable with. But if, if it’s a case that you shouldn’t need a lawyer for, I don’t want to have to be involved in it. If you’re comfortable doing it, if you’re not. And you say to us, look, we need you to do this. We’re willing to pay the fee for it. We’re willing to help anybody. I don’t want people to think that we don’t want. To help them, but we don’t want to help people in those situations where at the end of the day, they’re like, why the heck did you get involved here? Absolutely. And I love that and I love the awareness there too, and it’s probably going to lend itself and I know the book just launched a March in the last month. It’s probably going to lend itself, you know, when that consumer. Calls you and has that, you know, very low value case. You can now maybe ship them the book. You’ve got it. You nailed it. That’s my goal. My goal is to just say, look, you know, like here’s a book. You, you, you have a way to get your case done. I’m sorry that I can’t help you. You can hire other firms, like go to other firms. There’s people, that’ll take it, run with it and you’ll pay a lot of money and you may end up upside down. I think if you do it on your own, you’ll end up right. Set up.

Chris Dreyer

I love that. And you know, one of the things as a marketing agency that I see is many of those one star reviews that the firm gets, it’s not because of the experience it’s that they didn’t take the case. Yeah, they come to affirm and they hell we wouldn’t take this case and they get all upset, but now you have an outlet to provide value back to those individuals in that need.

Brian LaBovick

Yeah. Yeah. We’ve um, there there’s. Yeah, it’s true. You can’t please, everybody. There’s always going to be people that are unhappy with your service. They don’t like your advice. They take your advice and then they get mad about your advice. But for the most part, I think if you treat people honestly and fairly, and you can give them a good. A good reference point and a good outcome that you, you ended up getting a lot of five star reviews, which is what you need these days.

Chris Dreyer

Absolutely. You know, and writing a book is one of those extremely time consuming processes. And it just seems so verbose and like it’s going to take forever and you know, so let’s talk about that experience in itself, you know? Did you have a daily, you know, a theme like every Thursday, I’m going to write for X amount of time. How did that process go? Uh, creating the book.

Brian LaBovick

That was exactly what it was. So COVID hit. COVID for me was a blessing because I leaned into it and I had more time. I was sent home. I had to be in my house, which was, you know, a good and a bad thing for awhile. You know, like there was all that time at home. You ended up like, instead of working from home, you ended up living your work. Right? So instead of having like 12 hours a day at work, I started having 24 cause I was living in my work, right. So I could just be at the kitchen table and work and work and work and eat and then keep working work and work and then eat my wife thought I was a little obsessed, but I ended up setting up a schedule where twice a week, I wrote for about two to three hours a week for a period of eight months, just cranked it out, you know?

Chris Dreyer

You know, when you’re, when you’re unpacking the brain and you’re riding around this, did you find yourself thinking, Oh, this would be a great blog topic on my website too. Or did you, did you have any of those types of experiences?

Brian LaBovick

Yeah, so, um, I’m, I’m fortunate that I have a marketing. Uh, director and she’s got, you know, the ability to take what I’m writing and then repurpose it, you know, into different things. So we are right now in the midst of, you know, redoing a website and redoing our stuff. And so we’re trying to put a lot of stuff into that website and the website. I think you saw. Is an, is a newly built website. Um, but we’re redoing some of the backend SEO stuff and adding some content. I think the book is going to help a lot on.

Chris Dreyer

Nice. Yeah. So let’s, let’s talk about the marketing aspects of this. So I’d really like to dig in, because I think there’s a lot of fun stuff that you can do with it. So I love the aspect that it’s a, it’s a way to get on podcasts. Yeah. So let’s talk about that. So you had, um, a marketing specialist reach out to us. And perfect, absolutely fit our target audience, our personal injury attorneys listening, you know? So what are some of, what are some of the aspects that you plan to use the book, uh, from a marketing capacity? And maybe we can brainstorm some things together as well.

Brian LaBovick

So the, the, there’s a couple of things that I really love that I’m, that I’m getting good at as I get older and with a little experience. So one of them is this concept of, um, trying to. Give away as much knowledge as you have. One of the things that I’ve, that I’ve learned is that the more I put out into the world of just give it away knowledge. And the more I hear about people doing it, the better off people do and the better their product and service offerings are. And the more they’re able to do. And the more I give away. The more I get in the world. I really have this like crazy karmic philosophy that I had to learn. I, it didn’t come naturally to me, I’m naturally extremely competitive. I want to hold all my knowledge to me. I want to learn what you know, and then I want to use it against you in the future, because I want to be, you know, the King. But it’s not the way it works. And I’ve learned that’s not the way the universe works, right? The more we learn together, the more we blue ocean it and work on it together. The more you teach me and I teach you and you know, the better off the world is the better off my product is the better off my services. The better off everybody is. And more people keep coming. So for instance, you go on these trial order list serves right? So I’m a member of a couple of list serves nationally and people will say, Oh, does anybody have this? Does anybody have these documents? We have a lot, like, I have a very structured firm. We have employment manuals and we have vacation schedule policies and we’ve got, I mean, we’ve got a policy book and a training book and we’re doing, you know, training sessions and we’re doing onboarding and everything’s just smiled. There’s a lot that goes into a business. And a lot of law firms don’t know how to do any of that stuff. Right. But for years I’ve been developing this stuff. The more, I give it away and help other people, even in my own market to be better as lawyers, the more people call me and say, Hey, we want to do business with you. Right. I just had a lawyer in my market call me and say, and he’s a direct competitor. And say, Hey, um, you guys do PIP work. We don’t do PIP work. We want to work with you on PIP. You know, and I, I never believed that that would be possible because I thought, well, if we’re both advertising for PI cases, why would he give me business that makes me stronger, right? Because I’m giving him back business and a great referral relationship, right? And once we took over their pit practice, they ended up calling us and saying, Hey, you did a great job. You want to take over our SSD practice. So with another major advertiser in my market, I’ve got a great relationship where we’ve done PIP and SSD as partners on this stuff. Nobody knows about it. Like I’m not even going to mention their name, but we have a great relationship because I put it out there and I helped them. And then they called me, it’s been over a year and they said, Hey, we got a new lawyer in, he knows PIP. And he thinks that he can do it. We’re going to bring it back in house. And I said, Hey, don’t worry about it. Not only that, if you want any of the documents that you need, any of the systems, if you want any of the law, like whatever, you need to get better, have them contact our department. We’ll give him whatever you want. He was like, really? You give me everything. I’m like everything you need, like anything you need. Incredible. Right. And, and, and the more I do that, the more people are like, Hey, we want to work with you guys. You guys. And we’re getting my firm has never been so successful is when I started giving all my stuff away. It’s the craziest karmic thing ever.

Chris Dreyer

And that’s, that’s the, the Gary V where he talks about the jab jab, jab, right hook. But except for, you’re not coming in for the right hook, you’re coming, you’re getting the reciprocity back, the karmic reciprocity. I love that so much. Yeah. And even that from the consumer perspective, so you’ve got this, uh, reciprocity working with, we, you give them the book, but Hey, if you treated them right. And then they have a family member or friend or whoever, they may mention your name and then you get that referral. So I love that. Is it kind of like a loss leader?

Brian LaBovick

Yeah. It’s a loss leader. It’s my name getting out there. It’s expertise. It’s thought leader. So we want to be all of those things. We want people to feel like. There’s a Thoratec stative generous information out there and that they can count on us for that. The community can count on us for that the, the legal community, the, uh, the citizen community. Like we want people to just know they can count on us.

Chris Dreyer

Brian, isn’t the first lawyer to write a book and he certainly won’t be the last, the truth is there’s so much to being a lawyer and there are countless specialties to niche into meaning that nearly every attorney out there we’ll have a text or two in them. So for anyone out there wanting to create their own legal publication, I asked Brian what advice he has to help them put pen to paper.

Brian LaBovick

Pick something that’s fun that you liked writing about that is just you, you can do that, you know? Well that you can, like most of what I wrote about, I wrote off the top of my head just cause you know, it, you know, like I know. Personal injury lawn, you know, after 30 years of doing car accident cases, I know car accident case pretty well. So, and, and the other thing is that I think storytelling is really important. There are people that there’s help to books out there, right? Like you can get how to do this or how to do that. And it’s this huge compendium of boring things. People want to read stories. So I’ve had a lot of people who’ve read the book. It reads really fast. It’s super easy to read. It’s nice stories. And through storytelling, you learn what to do in a case. So it tells you something that happened in a story, apply it to your situation. And that’s a great way to learn, and I think it’s accessible and that’s what I wanted. I wanted an accessible book.

Chris Dreyer

I love that. I love the, the learning through the stories, analogies, those, those types of better experiences than just the kind of the research factual base. It makes me think of there’s a book that really resonated for me called profit first by Mike Michalowicz really what he’s teaching could probably be taught in a chapter, but he’s got so many great stories in there and it really makes the knowledge. And what he’s teaching sink in.

Brian LaBovick

Have you ever heard of a guy named Pat Lencioni? Oh,

Chris Dreyer

yeah.

Brian LaBovick

Yep. Okay. So all of his books, not all because the advantage is actually an instruction manual, but almost all of his books are these great stories, right? So you pick up a Pat the only book, and you know, you’re going to read something about building your business and making your business better. But it’s going to be a great story about human beings and what they went through and how it worked out. And you can almost picture the same things happening in your business as you read them, like you can really apply that. And that has helped me out tremendously and understanding. And then there’s another guy. I don’t know if you know, Gino, Wickman.

Chris Dreyer

Oh, yeah. Traction.

Brian LaBovick

Yeah, exactly traction. So there’s, there’s traction is great. Right. But tractions and instruction manual. Did you read, what is it? It’s a get a grip. Is that what it is?

Chris Dreyer

The swan company,

Brian LaBovick

exactly. The swan company. So I didn’t really understand traction as well as when I read, get a grip and then applied traction to it. And then I realized, okay, so this is what he’s talking about. You know,

Chris Dreyer

that was such a good book. I got to tell you when I was reading that book, I was like, Oh geez, we’ve had that exact same thing happened crazy.

Brian LaBovick

So have you ever gone to any of these masterminds, you go to a mastermind or you go to a business book, you go to CEO, you know, mastermind or whatever it is. And even the CEO masterminds that I’ll go to, which are like a plumber, a farmer, a guy who owns an electrical company, a wallpaper, and the guy who owns a closet company. Right. Identical problems across the board. Like what they’re dealing with. One guy comes in with this, they’re having a problem with this, their businesses, businesses, business, even the business of law. And it’s great to share that right.

Chris Dreyer

Absolutely. That makes me think of like Vistage and YPO and places like that. Yeah.

Brian LaBovick

Yeah. And I never got, I I’ve gotten into Vistige, but the YPO thing I really should have joined that when I was younger, I think I would have gone a lot faster. I would have gone through this maturation process 10 years earlier if I would have been in that group.

Chris Dreyer

Absolutely. Absolutely. Let’s shift over to the personal side now. So. Yeah. You’re, you’re deeply involved in charities from the American cancer association to fundraising for pace. You know, what makes you want to just keep giving back to the community? You said it didn’t come natural, but you’re doing so many things for the community now.

Brian LaBovick

So, um, I’ve got some things that I’m really passionate about at a personal level. My wife has some things she’s passionate about. Who’s my partner. Um, at a, at a personal level, my wife is the one who really brought me to the. To the core of what it means to help our community, what it means to be involved in, in the community and how, um, and then I, and I learned a couple of things, so I want to tell this quick story. Um, but I’ve got one friend who is a billionaire, just, I know one billionaire that personally. Well, there’s not a lot of them out there and maybe more now than before. Maybe it’s not as huge of a deal, but the B is a different level. Right. You know, the multimillionaires and all that. That’s that’s, you know, but the B takes things to another level. So I know one billionaire and he was telling me that he isn’t because the bees all know. So all the billionaires, you know, they, they hang with each other at some billionaire club somewhere. I don’t know, but he was talking with another major contributing person and they were talking about the karma of money. And how the karma of money is really hard to control because you put this huge amount of charity philanthropy out there. And a lot of it gets misapplied, misappropriated, misdirected. They feel like it’s super hard to control. You’re supposed to give with an open heart. You’re always worried about putting strings attached to it and not wanting your name attached to it in some places in some places you do. And he’s like the karma of money’s really hard. You know, and so what I’ve learned about at my level of charity, which is not a terrible level of charity, but is definitely not their level of charity, um, is that we can make it really good and keep the karma really good by being really local, because you can see at a local level how well your money will work for human beings. So the pace center for girls is a statewide. Program in Florida that takes at-risk girls and saves them from what would probably be a very difficult future and puts them on a track to a really wonderful future. And the, the young women who get to go through this program usually come out in a really positive direction direction for me, is, is everything right position as a relevant directions of what’s important. Um, and it puts them in a, in a wonderful direction with a great education. And a solid psychological base so that they can go into the world and be productive people, leaders, and, you know, take care of their families and have great lives. But you see it. You see it, how, like we know the girls who go, you know, the, the, one of the young women is my copier rep. Now, like she’s out making good money with a family, and now you see that they come from tough places, terrible places. And they, they, they survive and thrive. And so you see that karma of money. It makes you feel really good about it. You know, you go to, um, you go to, you know, let’s just do another, I don’t want to say anything bad about any other charities, but when you go to a local cancer charity, like the Sylvester. Charity group. Right? So they’ll Sylvester cancer center at university of Miami is a volunteer group of people that raise money for it’s called the Papanicolaou corps for cancer research. So the Pap Corps. Is a fundraising arm where 99, 98 or 99% of the money goes directly into cancer research. It doesn’t go to administration. It doesn’t go to vacations. It doesn’t go to people misappropriating money. It’s just cancer research. And so it’s easy to track. It’s easy to know your karma money. So those things have been drivers for us, where we find really good things to be involved in another charity that we’re involved in that I love. That’s one of my passions. Is talking with high school kids about the dangers of driving. And we’ve got a group of people that have done this together for a number of years. And it started with the Dory saves lives foundation and Irv Slosberg who lost his daughter to a terrible tragic accident. And that inspired him to create this. Foundation. And we’ve gone to tons of high schools and spoken to thousands of kids about traffic safety. And it’s a very powerful presentation. There’s another group that joined him. That was part of it that has their own thing called shattered dreams. And they were doing these. Giant extravagant, you know, plays on the football fields of major high schools, where it would be like a wreck scene and somebody gets arrested for DUI and they fly in the trauma Hawk to the field and you see bloodied people. And it’s really a powerful thing. And then we talk about it. I do the legal side of it. We have a sheriff do the criminal side of it. We have a trauma nurse do the trauma side of it. We have a driving instructor do the driving side of it. We have a race car driver. Talk about what he like just for star power. It’s cool as shit. I mean, it’s just pardon me, but it’s, it’s amazing, right? Fine. So that’s that makes you feel good.

Chris Dreyer

You’re you’re absolutely. You can see it. You can see it yeah. Around you. I love that aspect. I haven’t thought about that, but yeah, from a, from a local community perspective, you can say, Hey, you know, I affected this person’s life in a positive manner, because if you contribute to a big organization, you just don’t know where it’s going. And you’re hoping. That it makes a difference. So I love that, you know, just a couple of final questions here, Brian. So the, the next one, this is kind of shifting back, you know, you’ve been running your firm successfully for many years in your personal opinion. What, what makes a PI attorney stand out from the competition?

Brian LaBovick

I I’m going to go with what stands out to me. Right. So what stands out to me are people that I’ve looked at as heroes in this profession that I’ve looked up to for years and years because of what they brought to it. Right. And, uh, and there’s some, some people that have done this over the years that have been incredible. Passionate injury related lawyers. Right. And you know, one in my market, I think there’s probably one of the best in the history of our nation is Chris Searcy. And when you meet Chris Searcy and you talk to him about a case, you see the passion that he feels for his client, the caring that he feels for his client, the fact that he’s living that tragedy when you live that tragedy for your client and with your client, and you can drag that. Into a cogent process to let a jury see and feel and hear that that’s what you would want to look for, because I think that that capacity to do that and to storytell and to spell, bind that jury into understanding the real nature of the injury, the real value of that injury and how this human being needs to be properly compensated, because this is the way it’s done. And the jury has to step up and do that when you can do that. Then you’re being an heroic person for that, for that injured person. And that’s what you want to look for in a personal injury attorney. I mean, Stuart Grossman does that and there’s a lot, there’s lots of guys. I mean, I’m very lucky to have a lot of guys in our market that have been able to do that in Florida, Florida is filled with great trial lawyers. There’s great trial lawyers across the nation there’s guys in California that are great in New York, but those are the people that you want to look for. That can, that can do that for you.

Chris Dreyer

That’s incredible. And final question here, where can people listening go to learn more about you and where can they go to, to, to grab your book?

Brian LaBovick

Oh, so you can grab it on Amazon. You can grab it at target. You can grab it at Barnes and Nobles. I think even the local Barnes and Nobles are starting to want to carry it now, which is great because sales have been awesome. Um, so that’s where you can get it. You can also get it by going to my personal website, which is brianlabovick.com so I have my own author website and then we’ve got, I think, a link that we’ve developed on the labovick.com, which is the law firm site, labovick.com on the internet. So any of those places you’ll find a linkage to it, but Amazon just go to Amazon and type my last name and the book pops right up

Chris Dreyer

Brian’s karmic approach to being a lawyer and indeed a business owner putting out information into the world aggressively defending the wrong and funneling money into the local community. It’s not only a tangible ROI, but it’s, but also because it’s the right thing to do. I’d like to thank Brian LaBovick from the LaBovick Law Group for sharing a story with us. And I hope he gained some valuable insights from the conversation. You’ve been listening to the rankings podcast.
I’m Chris Dreyer. If you like this episode, or have an idea for a future guest, whose story you’d love to hear, leave me a review and tell me more. I’ll catch you next week with another inspiring story and some SEO tips and tricks all with page one in mind.

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