126. Brett Sachs, MVP Accident Attorneys – Crushing a Rebrand: Seamless Intake, Authentic Social, and Core Value Guidance

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Brett Sachs, founder at MVP Accident Attorneys, has evaluated thousands of personal injury cases, and recovered millions for his clients. But to win cases – you have to have the right clients. Brett is an expert in human connection and emphasizes the importance of a successful intake system to grow a firm. Named a National Trial Lawyers Top 40 under 40, Brett wanted to build a firm larger than the founders. Guided by core values – and a touch of personality – he successfully rebranded Sachs Law to MVP Accident Attorneys.

Today, Brett and I caught up to discuss how to build streamlined intake systems, how to rebrand for the most impact, and how commitment to core values drives business.

What’s in This Episode?

  • Who is Brett Sachs?
  • How can firms use DBA for a stronger brand?
  • How can firms create a successful intake program that generates more clients?
  • Where did Brett find inspiration for the Sachs Law rebrand?
  • How has shifting brand positioning from Sachs Law to MVP Accident Attorneys empowered the firm to be bigger than the founders?
  • How can a firm maintain personal connections to clients at scale?
  • How can core values guide a firm to success?

Transcript

Brett Sachs

But at the end of the day, if you’re putting your client first- My God, I believe that it will come back to you in full!

Chris Dreyer

We can’t win alone. Strong teams and community engagement, help firms serve more clients.

Brett Sachs

That’s part of being an MVP. It’s never about you. It’s always about how you can give back and how you can take the gift that was given to you to help others.

Chris Dreyer

You’re listening to Personal Injury Mastermind, where we give you the tools you need to take your personal injury practice to the next level. Brett Sachs, founder of MVP Accident Attorneys has been named a National Trial Lawyers Top 40 Under 40, has evaluated thousands of personal injury cases and recovered millions for his clients. Through social media and rebranding, Brett a secured, ideal positioning for his brand. Today, Brett and I caught up to discuss how a streamline intake is critical to growth, how to rebrand for the most impact and have commitment to core values drive business. I’m your host, Chris Dreyer, founder and CEO of Rankings.io. We help elite personal injury attorneys dominate first page rankings with search engine optimism. Being at the forefront of marketing is all about understanding people. So let’s get to know our guests. Here’s Brett Sachs, founder at MVP Accident Attorneys, and what sparked his interest in the legal field.

Brett Sachs

It was my father to be honest, but my father owned a business. There was a point in time where his business was struggling very heavily and. He quit paying himself for us significant amount of time and to keep a roof over our heads, he would go and work for the Indianapolis Airport, delivering lost luggage in the middle of the night. So he worked at the office during the day. And then in the middle of the night, he’d be returning the lost luggage. And so the work ethic that my father instilled into me led me into a profession and he always says he got super lucky in business going into a general business degree, it’s 50/50 if I’m going to be successful in that or not. So only always go into a recession-proof type of profession. If I want to be. Successful and I’ve always wanted to help people. I always want to get into law. I wanted to be an FBI agent growing up, so it just mirrored and matched. And this is where it led me because, I wanted to make a big difference in the industry and have a significant impact on people’s lives.

Chris Dreyer

I love that answer for so many reasons. And the work ethic that was passed on from your father clearly is showing in how quickly you guys have grown. I got to ask the FBI thing. what was the deal with the FBI?

Brett Sachs

Honestly, it’s just looked cool in movies. It was better than a police officer, but, still had that type of charisma and, you got to wear a suit every day. It’s funny. Cause I barely wear suits now. I think it was just the control and the power that and the safety aspect, but at least trying to, do better. our version of superheroes a thing.

Chris Dreyer

And so you worked in the personal injury space and then you did the defence space, your, you did criminal defense, so what made you come back to PI?? You know what, when you look at these two areas of the law what’s the distinction and the why that you move back over?

Brett Sachs

Yeah, it’s probably not even what you think. So I never went to law school to be a personal injury lawyer. I actually wanted to go into family law because Im a product of a divorced family. And, I love both my mom and my father, but we were putting them at all at times, and it was very hard. And so I wanted to make sure that, I could help other families not have to go through that. I spent probably two months in a family law office after law school. And I was like, Nope, this isn’t for me. It didn’t fit my vibe. So I started applying anywhere I could get a job in California and it landed me in a personal injury law firm. And it has that prestige that I always wanted to be in. It was a great firm. So I applied to a law clerk position that they only had a position at intake. They were like, you’re way over qualified for this. And I just said, just get me the door. I like I’ll take any salary. I will do anything you want. I will prove myself. The only thing I asked is that if a position opens up for a normal associate that you give me the shot after I’ve proven myself wherever you want to put me and they took a risk on me. I think that they made a great decision. I out proved myself quite a bit so much so that they came to me and they basically hired around me. The next associate position that opened up, they hired Somebody else. essentially it’s because they couldn’t remove me from the intake role. I was killing it not only in my opinion, but in my, at the time direct supervisor’s opinion. I have very positive energy that connect very well with people. I’m able to identify issues and problems right away and address them. So I just did a very good job of retaining more clients that are my predecessor with the same amount of calls and intakes I loved it and it’s what I would naturally good at. But I went to law school to be a lawyer and After a couple of years of doing that, I wanted to switch into a more, quote-unquote lawyer position. And my wife worked for a defense firm at the time. I saw her doing motions and briefs and going to court all the time and I’m like, that’s what I want to do. So that led me into defence . And again, what’s nice about me is I realized very quickly when I don’t like something. And I realized very quickly, I didn’t like litigation. I didn’t like defense. I didn’t like the real lawyer type of position. And so what led me back into PI is that I realized that I loved the business of law more than the practice of law. So I’m more of an operator than I am an attorney or a lawyer. And being an attorney or lawyer allows me to operate a law firm. And it was either go back to my previous firm with my tail between my legs, Or it was, Hey, maybe I can try to do this myself, fix on things that I think could be worked on and do it better. And here we are today. So that’s how it led me back into PI.

Chris Dreyer

That’s incredible that you have that introspection, that awareness, that you knew what you’re great at, where what brought you passion and you didn’t spend too much time in those other areas. And that’s really exciting before we jump into MVP Accident Attorney. And sax law just briefly, you specialize in intake, you did way better than your press predecessors. What are some of the main things that you see that make a successful intake for a personal injury firm?

Brett Sachs

That’s a great question. I say this to my intake team all the time. So if they watch this, I hope they believe it. Intake is the most important department of any strong law firm. And it, Some lawyers or some law firms have lawyers doing, take some offerings, have lawyers, oversee intake, and have intake specialists handle most of the calls. As long as you’re doing it ethically and you’re not having anyone who’s not an attorney give legal advice. It’s okay to have a strong sales man in that position, somebody who can understand and identify people and humanize the conversation. There’s so many times we call it acting like the DMV. No offense, the people that we’re going to DMV, but we all know. it just, it’s boring. There’s nothing exciting going on. And these people are calling us in times of need. And so showing them compassion and empathy and caring and having designated people to give them the time that they deserve on these intake calls is what I believe sets us apart and sets any good intake team apart. It’s the ability to connect with individuals and people And not everyone can do that. we’ve gotten some of our biggest clients out of referrals of cases we rejected because we just spent the time with these people and explaining them don’t waste your time anymore. There isn’t any liability here. Like obviously we’re just one law office, but just giving them the rundown and not just hanging the phone up on the oh and answering the phone. I know that selves sounds pretty obvious, but you’d be surprised how many law firms our clients have called in the past and we asked them like, what brought you to us? It’s I called two other firms and left messages and no one got back to me. Which blows my mind. It really does blow my mind. Being available, having the time to show these people that we actually care, whether it’s a case we can take or not and being able to connect and humanize what they’re translating to us is vastly important to getting to the parts where you can qualify a case or not.

Chris Dreyer

EQ side of that. And the emotional intelligence, just more and more, it feels like we’re just connected to our phones and the hard skills and things. And I think that human element has been lost and now it’s just so much more valuable than it ever has been. And I think that’s incredible.When you look at outsourcing say intake. The one thing I’ve always wondered is how do they handle referral situations for the cases that you can’t take? They’re probably not going to monetize those and then you’re not going to get the reciprocity, right?

Brett Sachs

Hundred percent Chris it’s so interesting. And outsourcing intake in general, I just have never been a fan of. I believe that we are a technology focused firm, we’re trying to be a firm of the future. Automation is important. Outsourcing is important in some aspects, but not in intake. We actually have full 24 hour intake teams in house. But we do have a calling service that vets our calls initially. So it’s it was a call that’s not even related to law or it’s a sales or it’s a solicitor or something like that. It doesn’t waste any of our intake team time. So we had a case where there was a lawyer that follows me on Instagram, up north trying to refer me a case. The calling service said that we don’t do that. And she was like, I’m confused. And so the calling service was confused that it was a referral from an attorney for us. It wasn’t even like a case. We can’t take them. You wanted to refer out and capture it was a case for us and we almost lost it. Thank God she reached out on me on Instagram. We got the case. We actually fired that calling service, this happened last week, we were done with that calling service. We hired someone new we’re on board, but it makes it very difficult if you outsource intake, like our calling sources have a list of types of cases that we can push through to other lawyers. Like I’m part of a great network called JHQ justice HQ it’s started and founded by Bob and Brad, Simon and Theresa Deb. And we have a great community of lawyers. So I can capture a lot more cases this way because I can trust that we can get these clients to good lawyers that I know work very well. So our intake has that list. Our calling service has that list of types of cases. And our calling services is designed to err on the caution of sending it through to us so that we can make that determination at the end of the day. But it’s impossible to capture even cases you want, if you’re outsourcing your intake, let alone cases, you want to at least monetize in a referral or capturing some other aspect. I just, I highly disagree with outsourcing intake. It just doesn’t work as efficiently as it should. Or as we would like it to. So we have everything in house.

Chris Dreyer

Sometimes the best branding ideas come from unlikely sources. Brett shares how he switched from Sachs Law to MVP Accident Attorneys.

Brett Sachs

So I’ve always been a sports fan and I, I connect with sports. I love the team atmosphere. I’ve learned a lot from playing sports, growing up. My favourite sports are baseball and football. So I just always been connected to the sports theme. very early on. I wanted to be connected with some type of sports team. And I’m originally from Indiana. And so I wanted to have a connection with a team locally and not just be fair weather and in Orange County. So the Angels made sense. I contacted the Angels and said, Hey, I want to be on the radio. You guys have a radio station, Can make this work. It was very small deal. They didn’t lead it really anything, but. Got me onto their radio station and their main broadcaster is Roger Lodge. And so I had a copy of one of our scripts. And then at the end it said that I’m the Mike Trout of personal injury. And he’s you definitely can’t say that. And I was like, why not just get permission to from Mike. He’s not going to care. He’s a good guy. He was like, that’s not how this works. But either way. Roger was the one that said, how would we just say MVP of PI? Cause Mike Trout and MVP. And I was like, dude done love it. But I had no money. I had no idea of how to brand this. It just was an idea that sat in the back of our heads for a couple years. And we set it on the radio a couple of times, but it never really led to anything. But I’ve always loved the idea because again, MVP’s Excel at their position under extreme circumstances. They always make it through no matter what. And they’re always a team player. So it fits extremely well with what I wanted to do with the firm. And it’s funny, Teresa. At the time she’s on the founder of JHQ he also owns Outlier Created Agency. So she is, she’s awesome at marketing and branding and she helps out the Simon Law Group. So I said, Hey, are you available? Do you like this brand? You like this idea? Can we do something with it? And she immediately was like, I’m dropping everything I’m doing.I love this. Yeah, let’s figure out something to do with it. So she came up with the logos, she came up with the positioning really focused on how we want to present this to the consumers and to the profession. And then I also brought in which is important Brett Burtner who was actually my old supervisor at my old firm who helped build basically build another major brand in the industry. And he came on board and when he looked at it, he freaking loved it as well, but he saw some issues with what was going on. And so between him and Theresa, we brought Brett in Teresa, phased out a little bit. We’re still great friends. She still helped us out on a lot of things. She just did a video for us recently. So I still love her but Brett being in house really transitioned it and has taken everything from folks from Sachs Law to MVP. And that transition has happened over about a year and a half now. we’re still obviously working on it, so it’s a transition and a long period to go, but. What we loved about the MVP brand and what it’s done to our firm is it’s solidified something to believe in. We’re not just a law firm or a business. We are something bigger than ourselves. And the, one of the other reasons why I liked the brand of MVP over Sachs Law is that I don’t have to be associated with it. The MVP to me is the firm, not me, not, a face on a billboard, God forbid something happens to me. What do you do with that? I want this firm, I want our brand. I want our clients to always have something to trust and believe in. Whether I’m personally here or not. It’s super important to me that the attorneys, the case managers, the intake specialists, the receptionist, they, that our controller, our management team, every person that walked into this office is a direct result on our product. And they all deserve to feel. Like they are the MVP. So I needed a brand that resonated universally and not just around me or my last name. So that’s that also fit, and then it was perfect towards where we want to take our firm.

Chris Dreyer

One of the things I like about it is, that. There’s this restrictions around like superlatives, like best and top and specialized … MVP you say that it it embodies all of these plus the team player. It’s three, letters. And immediately when you see the MVP in the search results, we were like who’s this from? That’s the MVP. I’m going to go with that. So I think that there is some, even some social proof type into the name, like who would call themselves MVP and just wouldn’t be good. Like you got to own that. As I saw every characteristic that you’re talking about on your tick tock, I was like, I’m researching you Brett. And I kept seeing the team, I are definitely in a lot of those, but you always incorporated the team. I even saw the one video where they’re throwing the basketball and then they’re introducing like what their role is at the front. So it really is the true team mentality. And. On that. And some of those tick talks, there was one that had 1.2 million views and likes. What did you have any issues getting the DBA going through that process?

Brett Sachs

Yes. For anyone in California, a law corporation can’t actually legally have a DBA. So we didn’t know that, but at the time we just, we researched it. I had an opinion on it. Like I have legal counsel. And I said, Hey, how do we update the state bar on this brand that we’re building? Because I don’t want to confuse any of the consumers. I want them to know Hey, we’re the same firm. So we came up with a logo that basically said, MVP, Accident attorneys, a Sachs Law Company. And that was in all of our promotional stuff. So then it was no confusion but even doing so we technically were practicing, a brand that we. Technically allowed to do according to the state bar rules, we fix that very quickly. And that was one of the other reasons why we got real sex laws. We have to legally change our name from Sachs Law to MVP Accident Attorneys to do it right. But getting back to the DBA aspect of it and why it’s a. Why it’s so important and how hard it was to get that moving. We had to protect the brand But there was major trademark things that we had to go into right away to, to protect the brand. There’s a couple of other firms in California that have like the partners’ initials and up being MVP. There’s an MVP law group. They do like elder abuse and family law stuff. There’s a, an MVP law firm, I think in LA they do personal injury, but there’s not a it’s not a big brand. And so we had, we found all this out after trademarking thing. Goodness. So if we have any issues with it, we have our protection. URLs vanity numbers, like you said, you type in MVP. We have to show up and we have to protect our image and make sure that there is no confusion as to who we are when people are looking up that name. So it was super important to make sure that it was done correctly and have it done in a way that resonates really well on. I just want to make sure everyone in California knows he can’t do a DBA.

Chris Dreyer

We had a previous conversation about, doing DBS and fictitious names in order to legally, incorporate keywords like in your business, sensitive Google local, because despite what many people believe the vicinity update did not fix that keyword is still work in the name.

Brett Sachs

Absolutely. That was, again, that was one of the reasons and not only MVP, but have accident attorneys in the actual name so that we ranked when you type in accident, attorney doesn’t really matter where you’re at, that will rank and that will come up. And it was crazy. We, as soon as we made this change, I don’t know how the industry just blew up with it because every major firm in California now bids on MVP acts and attorneys. So when you type in MVP, ax, attorneys, all the big names are in the ads. I don’t even think we’ve bid on our own name because it’s so expensive now. So it’s like a huge compliment to us. But we, in the organic stuff we have to show up it’s important.

Chris Dreyer

Yeah. so organic for those listening and the local three-pack it’s relevance, distance and prominence relevance is keywords. So keywords in the reviews. If you’re doing backpack giveaways and things like that, and people are talking about your backpacks and not the law or your city, that doesn’t help you as much in terms of local SEO as may, a true review would. The core philosophy at your firm is it’s not business, it’s personal and. As you grow your firm and you’ve, you guys have grown very quickly, how do you maintain that personal connection? That personal attention? I know we talked about intake but how does that translate throughout the whole process?

Brett Sachs

It starts from us as a family and everyone that touches a file has to truly believe in that, in the fact that this is a personal service that we are rendering. We have meetings with all of our staff anywhere from reception, all the way up to our attorneys. And recently even we were talking to you and her assistant, and I was explaining to her do you understand that the task that you’re given have direct impacts on people’s lives? Like we’re not serving burgers and fries here. Like you sending out this letter at this time is vastly important because it can have a direct impact on a case. It can have an impact if you don’t send this letter of representation, the day that we asked you to send it, the insurance company doesn’t know that we’re representing the client to reach out to the client. The client can say something that they’re not supposed to say, and it could completely derail a case from the very beginning, like these things matter, everything matters. And so instilling that into the team. All the time, letting them remember that they’re not just putting, pressing keys on a keyboard and looking at a screen. These are human lives that we are actually dealing with. And they’re going through some of the toughest times that they’ll ever go through. And sometimes we’re frustrated. Sometimes they’re angry. Sometimes they’re confused. Sometimes they just don’t remember what we said. It’s our job to be that sounding voice for them and to get them back on track and to give them that human component and let them feel like it isn’t business, it’s personal which is difficult when you’re running a business. There is aspects of what we do that has to pay for what we’re doing. But at the end of the day, if you’re putting your client first. My God, I believe that it will come back to you in full, when I first started this firm, I ended up a handful of cases that had really great offers on it. And like I needed the money. I’m like, bro, I, haven’t not that I’m scared that I can’t pay my rent in four months. I don’t know what’s going to happen. I’m not getting continuous intakes. This is scary. I’ll have even six figure offers on these cases that could yield more money for me at the time than I had ever. I had to turn down those offers and do what’s right for my clients and get them to affirm that they litigated at the time. So that my clients didn’t suffer. And I didn’t see those referral checks for years later. And that was scary. But if you’re always doing what’s right for your client, I promise you the rest will come.

Chris Dreyer

It starts from within. The core values at MVP guide every decision -from hiring and firing to daily choices made by each team member -to make sure the client comes first. Brett is a big believer in manifestation and the power of positive thinking, which he and his team carry through every aspect of their cases.

Brett Sachs

If you’re not living up to these core values on a continuous basis you’re just not right for us. It doesn’t mean you’re a bad person. It doesn’t mean you’re a bad employee or you’re bad at your job. It just means that you just don’t fit within our culture. . And that’s super important to us. Alongside of that how does our clients feel like they’re our only client when they’re in a firm of my size, it comes down to my policies, my procedures, my systems, and how I’ve organized it to make them feel that way. Every one of our cases has a team of five people working on their case. It has an attorney I’m a very big component on attorneys, settling cases, even pre-lit sorta attorney oversees all the cases. The attorney has a case manager. The case manager has an assistant. We have medical records. We have leans, we have a director of case management to oversee stuff. We have an auditor. So there’s people that are consistently looking at every case all the time and each person on that case has a very specific job duty so that they’re not being tied down or having an organizer day doing a bunch of other stuff. Like I don’t want my case manager to have to worry about seeing that letters of representation. I want them worried about talking to our clients. I want constant communication, constant education. I want my client to call it. To know that someone’s going to answer the phone, or if we’re just can’t someone’s going to get back to them within a very reasonable time. What that time is, it depends on what’s going on, but if our clients aren’t getting phone calls returned back by the end of the business day or at worst 24 hours, if it’s a weekend, like we have a problem with that. We track client communication with our firms. So you know, a lot of our KPIs. Are directed towards client satisfaction and making that personal touch on every single client’s case. So I think that the culture from within plus our systems help build that it’s not business, it’s personal type of mentality.

Chris Dreyer

The one thing that you said about values that I really appreciate is as you own, you judge, you have KPIs, you evaluate these values. So many times, you know, individuals, they go through traction or EOS and they’ll say, oh, we’re going to pick our values. And they pick these aspirational values. Core values are not aspirational. They’re who you are. And I think that you measuring them and Look, it doesn’t mean you’re a bad person. You just don’t share the value if we’re not rowing in the same direction.

Brett Sachs

Exactly. And it’s interesting too. It’s funny you bring up Traction, I’ve obviously read Traction. I’ve read Fireproof. I worked with Mike Morris a lot. These are a huge component in building, our core values and just the type of systems that we instill. And it, I met Mike very recently, so like I’ve had all this in play. I’m a person who loves to mentor people, but I’m the first person to want to mentor. So I will find anyone who’s done this bigger and better than me and achieves what I want to achieve in the way that I want to achieve it. I’m going to run to them and I want to say, teach me whatever it takes. I’m there for you. So Mike’s one of those people. There’s a lot of other people that I go to every day for advice. But I love that, EOS type of mentality. It’s very important, but getting back to that core values. Yeah. It’s not ambition or aspiration it’s who are you? True. Deep down inside of you. It’s like one of our core values is extreme ownership. Have extreme ownership off of what you don’t ever blame somebody else for your mistake, for your issues. Learn from it, understand it, take constructive criticism, understand that we’re all in this together. If you can’t have extreme ownership off of what you’re of what you’re doing each and every day, your work product will show and it will just, it won’t live up to that. It’s not business it’s personal. Collaboration is one of our core values. We have. We are a team. We set our chases up in teams for a reason you have to work together, you cannot tap somebody and just play off. Like it’s not your job anymore. If your assistant’s busy, get on the phone and get that record to get that demand out. , do whatever it takes to work as a team. And no job is to meet you and no job as a above you. So like those are a couple of our core values that we feel is true to who we want to be and who we are. And if you’re just not that, then, you know what, there’s a thousand other personal injury lawyers probably a five mile radius of me that would love to take you from me. we have so many people poaching our employees every single day because of what we instill into them. And you know what, the ones that are still here, they’re here for a reason. And I, we have one attorney that’s been with us from the very beginning. She’s phenomenal. All of our attorneys are phenomenal, but this particular one got multiple LinkedIn offers. There was one, I think at the time I was, she was like making like $75,000. It was like when she first started and another for a receptor and said, we’ll give you a $10,000 signing bonus and $150,000 salary to leave. That was like, wow, that’s hard to pass up. I’m like, I don’t, I wouldn’t have blamed you if I, whatever, but she’s like, Nope, this is what I love to do. You’re who I believe in this is where I believe is the success of what I want to become. And I just, it’s not worth it. The money’s not worth it. Those are the type of people that we need here. And she’s making a lot more than $75000 now that obviously, but that’s the type of team member that we have at our office. And we’re very family oriented, Chris, and, as a business owner, it’s very difficult to say that. Because when people think of family, it’s hard to instill a corporate structure sometimes when you have that family style. But it’s just understanding the respect of what that means. It just means that we care about our team. We’re here for our team. If you’re here for us, if you’re loyal to us, we’re loyal to you. And that’s just how it goes.

Chris Dreyer

Take home pay is not the only factor when attracting top talent. Cultivating a culture of engagement begins with common goals. One shared goal at MVP is community involvement, which fuled a partnership with the LA Galaxy. .Though they are no longer partnered. He had this insight from the experience to share:

Brett Sachs

We did choose the galaxy for a very particular reason and that was community involvement. It just so happens that during the time that we partnered with them with COVID, we weren’t able to have that true involvement with their foundation, with their youth groups. We want it to really embody the Galaxy and their community because they have very loyal fans. We interviewed the chargers, we interviewed USC. The galaxy was brought to me by a friend and it worked out and then they went through a couple of leadership changes. We wanted to do way more with them then we were able to do and uh, at the time. It just didn’t make any more sense for us. Because it’s one thing to put my name up with a brand, which is phenomenal. That’s a great branding strategy, getting silly connects you. And it’s a great ego play. But it wasn’t accomplishing what we truly wanted to embody from the partnership in my heart. As much as it hurts to let them go. We had to make that decision, they have major supportive groups that, that had no idea who we were and they were not in any way helping us bridge that gap. It’s just. We can accomplish all these things by ourselves. We don’t need the Galaxy brand to do that. They had a line of other firms I wanted, and then we just said, since our heart’s not in it anymore, why keep those other firms away? We left on wonderful terms. And we have a lot of really big things that we’re going to do that we’re really excited about this year. And it has a lot to do with that community involvement. We give back, we donated, 5,000 backpacks last year. Children in need. One of our clients called us after we settled her case. And a lot of times clients call, we want their money. Once the case settles, okay. They want their money and I get it they’re in hard times. But this particular client gave me. When I heard, so I heard the voice cause I’m on everything. I’m OCD about it. It was an after hours call. So I heard the recording. And she was asking for an update on the status to get her money because she wanted to take the money to build homeless kits for the home. And I immediately, I’m talking about that. I’m still doing chills. Like I’m literally like about to get emotional about this. I immediately called her myself and I just say, you will not be taking care of this. You will be getting your money and we will pick up this tab and we will go out to the community of LA and we will walk with you. We will donate everything that we want to do on your behalf. This is so more important than you and you deserve, you were the one in the accident you deserve to take this money for you and your family. She was a mother too. It’s not like she was well off, like my gosh. And so those are the things that, that we like to do.And you know what Chris, most of the things that we do have, you’ll never see, we’re never going to advertise. We’re never gonna videotape. We did. All the time to give back to our community and outside our community to do anything that we can. And, one of the things that Chelsea I did was there’s a LA trial lawyers, charity organization. And, we were a very big part of bringing, helping bring that down. The Orange County with a phenomenal lawyer down here named Michelle Lest. She’s just a badass trailer. She is the president on the vice-president and Chelsea’s the secretary but we’re on the exec board of the OCT TLC. So Orange County Trial Lawyers Charities Organization. To help the community out even more and we’re, we raised money every day for, local community outreach programs, Chelsea and I still very much value education and there’s so many people that don’t have access to the right education. So we want to start a foundation to give back and give scholarships. And we’re just, we’re running it a million miles an hour here, Chris and most of our ideas get pushed back and you know what, what’s more important at what time, but. every MVP in sports, they always showcase before the super bowl or before, a championship game, all the players out in the community, that’s part of being an MVP. It’s never about you. It’s always about how you can give back and how you can take the gift that was given to you to help others. And that’s really what we’re here to do. But we’re building this to be something way bigger than Chelsea or I, or anyone else here. And if anyone listening needs are. Please feel free to give us a call at this. We’re, again, we’re very blessed. We’ve worked very hard to be in the position that we’re in. We’re nowhere near where we want to be. But we do have access to the ability to help people that are in need and need it more than we do.

Chris Dreyer

I love every bit about that. Thank you for that, Brett. And big picture, you know what’s next for MVP Accident Attorneys?

Brett Sachs

We want to make historical change to our profession and we want people to look at personal injury as. Not a bottom feeder type of law profession, but a rockstar, human changing industry. And part of my goal is to change everyone’s perception of what a major advertiser or billboard attorney can do. We are not going to diminish product for our clients and hurt our clients value of cases. Because we want more cases. It’s all about the quality of our work product, and we will change this industry’s perception of what a large volume personal injury firm can do. And we will, we are creating systematic value in cases and based on our research, we’re already doing three, four, 5% more of our better than our competitors and similar case studies. And we’re going to achieve much better results in the future, but I can’t even see the end because I think that if you could I’ve already limited our ability to get there. Sky’s the limit with people who truly care. And that’s what we have here.

Chris Dreyer

A firm a strong brand solidifies something to believe in. Something that is bigger than the founders and the partners. Brett and his team at MVP put community first at every turn and is paying off in dividends. Remain connected to your core values and draw from your interests when considering a rebrand, once your firm begins to grow, maintain personal connection and put the client first Outsource and systematize where you can, saving talent and resources for client engagement and case work. I’d like to thank Brett Sachs from MVP Accident Attorneys for sharing his story with us and I hope you gained some valuable insights from the conversation you’ve been listening to Personal Injury Mastermind. I’m Chris Dreyer. If you liked this episode, leave us a review. We’d love to hear from our listeners. I’ll catch you on next. Week’s PIMM with another incredible guest and all the strategies you need to master personal injury marketing.

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